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Article

Resource Capacity Requirement for Multi-Terminal Cooperation in Container Ports

1
Department of Industrial Systems and Management, National University of Singapore, 1 Engineering Drive 2, Singapore 117576, Singapore
2
Lee Kong Chian School of Business, Singapore Management University, 50 Stamford Rd., Singapore 178899, Singapore
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Hyerim Bae
Appl. Sci. 2021, 11(19), 9156; https://doi.org/10.3390/app11199156
Received: 4 August 2021 / Revised: 25 September 2021 / Accepted: 28 September 2021 / Published: 1 October 2021
Capacity sharing among neighboring terminals offer a means to meet increasing or unexpected demand for cargo-handling without additional capital investment. This study proposes a model for capacity requirement planning of major resources, such as quay cranes (QCs), storage space, and gate, in multiterminal port operations where demand is time dependent. A resource profile simulation is run to generate random events across the terminals and estimate the capacity requirement in the form of workload distributions on port resources over time-shifts. The effects on workload requirement, arising from multiterminal cooperation, are subsequently evaluated in consideration of different container flows among terminals. Experimental results suggest that higher transferring rate between terminals will reduce the QC intensity and storage space requirements but increase gate congestion. Variabilities in the QC intensity and storage space requirements also increase due to shorter stays and more movements in container inventory at the yard. The interaction effect between transferring and trans-shipment rates further shows that the average resource requirements for a terminal can be greatly reduced when the interterminal transferring of containers contributes positively to a more even workload redistribution across terminals. The most significant improvements occur when trans-shipment rate is 85% and transferring rate is 75% for QC intensity; trans-shipment rate is 90% and transferring rate is 60% for storage capacity; and trans-shipment rate is 80% and transferring rate is 75% for gate congestion. View Full-Text
Keywords: resource profiles; workload distributions; capacity requirement planning; trans-shipment hub; multiterminal operations resource profiles; workload distributions; capacity requirement planning; trans-shipment hub; multiterminal operations
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MDPI and ACS Style

Lee, B.K.; Low, J.M.W. Resource Capacity Requirement for Multi-Terminal Cooperation in Container Ports. Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 9156. https://doi.org/10.3390/app11199156

AMA Style

Lee BK, Low JMW. Resource Capacity Requirement for Multi-Terminal Cooperation in Container Ports. Applied Sciences. 2021; 11(19):9156. https://doi.org/10.3390/app11199156

Chicago/Turabian Style

Lee, Byung K., and Joyce M.W. Low. 2021. "Resource Capacity Requirement for Multi-Terminal Cooperation in Container Ports" Applied Sciences 11, no. 19: 9156. https://doi.org/10.3390/app11199156

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