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A History of Audio Effects

1
Centre for Digital Music, Queen Mary University of London, London E1 4NS, UK
2
Interdisciplinary Centre for Computer Music Research, University of Plymouth, Plymouth PL4 8AA, UK
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Appl. Sci. 2020, 10(3), 791; https://doi.org/10.3390/app10030791
Received: 16 December 2019 / Revised: 9 January 2020 / Accepted: 13 January 2020 / Published: 22 January 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Digital Audio Effects)
Audio effects are an essential tool that the field of music production relies upon. The ability to intentionally manipulate and modify a piece of sound has opened up considerable opportunities for music making. The evolution of technology has often driven new audio tools and effects, from early architectural acoustics through electromechanical and electronic devices to the digitisation of music production studios. Throughout time, music has constantly borrowed ideas and technological advancements from all other fields and contributed back to the innovative technology. This is defined as transsectorial innovation and fundamentally underpins the technological developments of audio effects. The development and evolution of audio effect technology is discussed, highlighting major technical breakthroughs and the impact of available audio effects. View Full-Text
Keywords: audio effects; history; transsectorial innovation; technology; audio processing; music production audio effects; history; transsectorial innovation; technology; audio processing; music production
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Wilmering, T.; Moffat, D.; Milo, A.; Sandler, M.B. A History of Audio Effects. Appl. Sci. 2020, 10, 791.

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