Next Article in Journal
Fractional-Order SIR Epidemic Model for Transmission Prediction of COVID-19 Disease
Previous Article in Journal
A Study on the Effects of Vertical Mass Irregularity on Seismic Behavior of BRBFs and CBFs
Previous Article in Special Issue
Use of Biofuel Industry Wastes as Alternative Nutrient Sources for DHA-Yielding Schizochytrium limacinum Production
Article

Searching for Appropriate Storage Conditions for Short-Term Wet Preservation of Porphyridium purpureum

Flemish Institute for Technological Research (VITO), 2400 Mol, Belgium
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Appl. Sci. 2020, 10(23), 8315; https://doi.org/10.3390/app10238315
Received: 30 October 2020 / Revised: 18 November 2020 / Accepted: 20 November 2020 / Published: 24 November 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Algal Biomass, Biofuels and Bioproducts)
It is often impossible in practice to process micro-algae immediately after their cultivation and harvest. This study, therefore, aimed to identify appropriate storage conditions for the wet preservation of Porphyridium purpureum. Algae were stored either as a concentrate or as a dilute culture at 4 °C, 8 °C, or 20 °C for 14 days and their quality was monitored. Concentrate storage tended to result in higher microbial numbers than dilute culture storage and clearly led to higher concentrations of malodorous organic acids. Butyric and isovaleric acid concentrations were about two orders of magnitude larger than their odor threshold values after 14 days of concentrate storage at 20 °C. Average B-phycoeryhrin (B-PE) levels were slightly higher after concentrate storage (2.5 ± 0.2 g B-PE/100 g organic matter) than after dilute culture storage (2.2 ± 0.5 g B-PE/100 g organic matter), probably due to respiration losses of other organic compounds in the first case. Significant amounts of organic matter got lost during concentrate storage (4–35%) as a result of carbohydrate degradation. The main restriction of concentrate storage was the rapid viscosity increase and formation of a weak gel structure complicating the later processing of the concentrates. These findings are highly relevant for P. purpureum cultivators and processors who have to store Porphyridium suspensions, even on a term of one day or less. View Full-Text
Keywords: Porphyridium purpureum; wet storage; rheology; B-phycoerythrin; carbohydrates; short-chain fatty acids Porphyridium purpureum; wet storage; rheology; B-phycoerythrin; carbohydrates; short-chain fatty acids
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Verspreet, J.; Soetemans, L.; Bastiaens, L. Searching for Appropriate Storage Conditions for Short-Term Wet Preservation of Porphyridium purpureum. Appl. Sci. 2020, 10, 8315. https://doi.org/10.3390/app10238315

AMA Style

Verspreet J, Soetemans L, Bastiaens L. Searching for Appropriate Storage Conditions for Short-Term Wet Preservation of Porphyridium purpureum. Applied Sciences. 2020; 10(23):8315. https://doi.org/10.3390/app10238315

Chicago/Turabian Style

Verspreet, Joran, Lise Soetemans, and Leen Bastiaens. 2020. "Searching for Appropriate Storage Conditions for Short-Term Wet Preservation of Porphyridium purpureum" Applied Sciences 10, no. 23: 8315. https://doi.org/10.3390/app10238315

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop