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Open AccessFeature PaperReview

Lignocellulosic Biomass as a Substrate for Oleaginous Microorganisms: A Review

1
Division of Genetics, Cell Biology and Development, Department of Biology, University of Patras, 26504 Patras, Greece
2
Centro de Biotecnología, Universidad de Concepción, Concepción 4030000, Chile
3
Facultad de Ciencias Forestales, Universidad de Concepción, Concepción 4030000, Chile
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Current address: Centro Regional de Investigación e Innovación para la Sostenibilidad de la Agricultura y los Territorios Rurales_CERES, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Valparaíso, Valparaíso 2340000, Chile.
Appl. Sci. 2020, 10(21), 7698; https://doi.org/10.3390/app10217698
Received: 18 September 2020 / Revised: 24 October 2020 / Accepted: 27 October 2020 / Published: 30 October 2020
Microorganisms capable of accumulating lipids in high percentages, known as oleaginous microorganisms, have been widely studied as an alternative for producing oleochemicals and biofuels. Microbial lipid, so-called Single Cell Oil (SCO), production depends on several growth parameters, including the nature of the carbon substrate, which must be efficiently taken up and converted into storage lipid. On the other hand, substrates considered for large scale applications must be abundant and of low acquisition cost. Among others, lignocellulosic biomass is a promising renewable substrate containing high percentages of assimilable sugars (hexoses and pentoses). However, it is also highly recalcitrant, and therefore it requires specific pretreatments in order to release its assimilable components. The main drawback of lignocellulose pretreatment is the generation of several by-products that can inhibit the microbial metabolism. In this review, we discuss the main aspects related to the cultivation of oleaginous microorganisms using lignocellulosic biomass as substrate, hoping to contribute to the development of a sustainable process for SCO production in the near future. View Full-Text
Keywords: oleaginous microorganisms; microbial lipids; lignocellulose pretreatment; enzymatic hydrolysis; inhibitors oleaginous microorganisms; microbial lipids; lignocellulose pretreatment; enzymatic hydrolysis; inhibitors
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MDPI and ACS Style

Valdés, G.; Mendonça, R.T.; Aggelis, G. Lignocellulosic Biomass as a Substrate for Oleaginous Microorganisms: A Review. Appl. Sci. 2020, 10, 7698. https://doi.org/10.3390/app10217698

AMA Style

Valdés G, Mendonça RT, Aggelis G. Lignocellulosic Biomass as a Substrate for Oleaginous Microorganisms: A Review. Applied Sciences. 2020; 10(21):7698. https://doi.org/10.3390/app10217698

Chicago/Turabian Style

Valdés, Gabriela; Mendonça, Regis T.; Aggelis, George. 2020. "Lignocellulosic Biomass as a Substrate for Oleaginous Microorganisms: A Review" Appl. Sci. 10, no. 21: 7698. https://doi.org/10.3390/app10217698

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