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Open AccessArticle

Nitrogen Mineralization in a Sandy Soil Amended with Treated Low-Phosphorus Broiler Litter

U. S. Department of Agriculture-Agricultural Research Service, Coastal Plains Soil, Water and Plant Research Center, 2611 W. Lucas St., Florence, SC 20501, USA
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Environments 2019, 6(8), 96; https://doi.org/10.3390/environments6080096
Received: 15 July 2019 / Revised: 9 August 2019 / Accepted: 11 August 2019 / Published: 14 August 2019
Low-phosphorus (P) litter, a manure treatment byproduct, can be used as an organic soil amendment and nitrogen (N) source but its effect on N mineralization is unknown. A laboratory incubation study was conducted to compare the effect of adding untreated (fine or pelletized) broiler litter (FUL or PUL) versus extracted, low-P treated (fine or pelletized) broiler litter (FLP or PLP) on N dynamics in a sandy soil. All four litter materials were surface applied at 157 kg N ha−1. The soil accumulation of ammonium (NH4+) and nitrate (NO3) were used to estimate available mineralized N. The evolution of carbon dioxide (CO2), ammonia (NH3), and nitrous oxide (N2O) was used to evaluate gaseous losses during soil incubation. Untreated litter materials provided high levels of mineralized N, 71% of the total N applied for FUL and 64% for PUL, while NH3 losses were 24% to 35% and N2O losses were 3.3% to 7.4% of the total applied N, respectively. Soil application of low-P treated litter provided lower levels of mineralized N, 42% for FLP and 29% for PLP of the total applied N with NH3 losses of 5.7% for FLP for and 4.1% for PLP, and very low N2O losses (0.5%). Differences in mineralized N between untreated and treated broiler litter materials were attributed to contrasting C:N ratios and acidity of the low-P litter byproducts. Soil application of treated low-P litter appears as an option for slow mineral N release and abatement of NH3 and N2O soil losses. View Full-Text
Keywords: organic nitrogen; mineralization; ammonia gas; nitrous oxide; nitrification; denitrification; manure; quick wash; poultry litter organic nitrogen; mineralization; ammonia gas; nitrous oxide; nitrification; denitrification; manure; quick wash; poultry litter
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Szogi, A.A.; Shumaker, P.D.; Ro, K.S.; Sigua, G.C. Nitrogen Mineralization in a Sandy Soil Amended with Treated Low-Phosphorus Broiler Litter. Environments 2019, 6, 96.

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