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Ammonia, Hydrogen Sulfide, and Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Lab-Scaled Manure Bedpacks with and without Aluminum Sulfate Additions

1
USDA Agricultural Research Service, Meat Animal Research Center, Spur 18D, Clay Center, NE 68933, USA
2
USDA Agricultural Research Service, Conservations and Production Research Laboratory, Bushland, TX 79012, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Environments 2019, 6(10), 108; https://doi.org/10.3390/environments6100108
Received: 26 July 2019 / Revised: 17 September 2019 / Accepted: 18 September 2019 / Published: 20 September 2019
The poultry industry has successfully used aluminum sulfate (alum) as a litter amendment to reduce NH3 emissions from poultry barns, but alum has not been evaluated for similar uses in cattle facilities. A study was conducted to measure ammonia (NH3), greenhouse gases (GHG), and hydrogen sulfide (H2S) emissions from lab-scaled bedded manure packs over a 42-day period. Two frequencies of application (once or weekly) and four concentrations of alum (0, 2.5, 5, and 10% by mass) were evaluated. Frequency of alum application was either the entire treatment of alum applied on Day 0 (once) or 16.6% of the total alum mass applied each week for six weeks. Ammonia emissions were reduced when 10% alum was used, but H2S emissions increased as the concentration of alum increased in the bedded packs. Nitrous oxide emissions were not affected by alum treatment. Methane emissions increased as the concentration of alum increased in the bedded packs. Carbon dioxide emissions were highest when 5% alum was applied and lowest when 0% alum was used. Results of this study indicate that 10% alum is needed to effectively reduce NH3 emissions, but H2S and methane emissions may increase when this concentration of alum is used. View Full-Text
Keywords: ammonia; beef; bedding; carbon dioxide; greenhouse gas; hydrogen sulfide; methane; nitrous oxide ammonia; beef; bedding; carbon dioxide; greenhouse gas; hydrogen sulfide; methane; nitrous oxide
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Spiehs, M.J.; Woodbury, B.L.; Parker, D.B. Ammonia, Hydrogen Sulfide, and Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Lab-Scaled Manure Bedpacks with and without Aluminum Sulfate Additions. Environments 2019, 6, 108.

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