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Behav. Sci. 2018, 8(9), 80; https://doi.org/10.3390/bs8090080

Understanding the Demographic Predictors and Associated Comorbidities in Children Hospitalized with Conduct Disorder

1
Department of Psychiatry, Griffin Memorial Hospital, 900 E Main St, Norman, OK 73071, USA
2
Department of Pediatrics, Oakleaf Eau Claire Medical Clinic, 3802 Oakwood Mall Dr, Eau Claire, WI 54701, USA
3
Department of Pediatrics, Windsor University School of Medicine, Brighton’s Estate, Cayon, St. Kitts P.O. Box 1621, Saint Kitts and Nevis
4
Saint Barnabas Hospital, 4422 Third Ave, Bronx, NY 10457, USA
5
Department of Psychiatry, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai/Elmhurst Hospital Center, 79-01 Broadway, Elmhurst, NY 11373, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 17 August 2018 / Revised: 1 September 2018 / Accepted: 3 September 2018 / Published: 4 September 2018
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Abstract

Objective: To determine the demographic predictors and comorbidities in hospitalized children with conduct disorder. Methods: A retrospective analysis was performed using the Nationwide Inpatient Sample (2012–2014). All patients were ≤18 years old and cases with a primary diagnosis of conduct disorder (n = 32,345), and a comparison group with another psychiatric diagnosis (n = 410,479) were identified using the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM)diagnosis codes. A logistic regression model was used to generate the odds ratio (OR) between both groups. Results: Children < 11 years old have a five times greater chance of admission for conduct disorder than adolescents (OR = 5.339). African American males are more likely to be admitted for conduct disorder. Children with conduct disorder from low-income families have a 1.5 times higher likelihood of inpatient admission compared to high-income families. These children have an about eleven times higher odds of comorbid psychosis (OR = 11.810) and seven times higher odds of depression (OR = 7.093) compared to the comparison group. Conclusion: Conduct disorders are more debilitating for children and families than many providers realize. African American males under 11 years are at the highest risk of inpatient management for conduct disorder. These patients have a higher risk of comorbid psychosis and depression, which may further deteriorate the severity of illness and require acute inpatient care. View Full-Text
Keywords: conduct disorder; comorbidities; schizophrenia; demographics; child; behavior; child psychiatry conduct disorder; comorbidities; schizophrenia; demographics; child; behavior; child psychiatry
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).
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Patel, R.S.; Amaravadi, N.; Bhullar, H.; Lekireddy, J.; Win, H. Understanding the Demographic Predictors and Associated Comorbidities in Children Hospitalized with Conduct Disorder. Behav. Sci. 2018, 8, 80.

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