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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle

Early Maladaptive Schemas and Cognitive Distortions in Adults with Morbid Obesity: Relationships with Mental Health Status

1
The Boden Institute of Obesity, Nutrition, Exercise & Eating Disorders, Sydney Medical School, Charles Perkins Centre, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia
2
School of Psychology, Faculty of Science, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia
3
Faculty of Psychology, Pontifical Catholic University of Rio Grande do Sul, Av. Ipiranga 6681, Porto Alegre/RS, CEP 90619-900, Brazil
4
Centre for Health Research and School of Medicine, The University of Western Sydney, Locked Bag 1797, Penrith NSW 2751, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Scott J. Hunter
Behav. Sci. 2017, 7(1), 10; https://doi.org/10.3390/bs7010010
Received: 4 November 2016 / Revised: 13 February 2017 / Accepted: 24 February 2017 / Published: 28 February 2017
Dysfunctional cognitions may be associated with unhealthy eating behaviors seen in individuals with obesity. However, dysfunctional cognitions commonly occur in individuals with poor mental health independently of weight. We examined whether individuals with morbid obesity differed with regard to dysfunctional cognitions when compared to individuals of normal weight, when mental health status was controlled for. 111 participants—53 with morbid obesity and 58 of normal weight—were assessed with the Mini-Mental State Examination, Young Schema Questionnaire, Cognitive Distortions Questionnaire, Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale, and a Demographic and Clinical Questionnaire. Participants with morbid obesity showed higher scores in one (insufficient self-control/self-discipline) of 15 early maladaptive schemas and in one (labeling) of 15 cognitive distortions compared to participants of normal weight. The difference between groups for insufficient self-control/self-discipline was not significant when mental health status was controlled for. Participants with morbid obesity showed more severe anxiety than participants of normal weight. Our findings did not show clinically meaningful differences in dysfunctional cognitions between participants with morbid obesity or of normal weight. Dysfunctional cognitions presented by individuals with morbid obesity are likely related to their individual mental health and not to their weight. View Full-Text
Keywords: obesity; morbid obesity; psychology; dysfunctional cognition; mental health obesity; morbid obesity; psychology; dysfunctional cognition; mental health
MDPI and ACS Style

Da Luz, F.Q.; Sainsbury, A.; Hay, P.; Roekenes, J.A.; Swinbourne, J.; Da Silva, D.C.; Da S. Oliveira, M. Early Maladaptive Schemas and Cognitive Distortions in Adults with Morbid Obesity: Relationships with Mental Health Status. Behav. Sci. 2017, 7, 10.

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