Next Article in Journal
A Nosological Exploration of PTSD and Trauma in Disaster Mental Health and Implications for the COVID-19 Pandemic
Next Article in Special Issue
Journalistic Denial of Death during the Very First Traumatic Period of the Italian COVID-19 Pandemic
Previous Article in Journal
Loneliness and Problematic Internet Use during COVID-19 Lock-Down
Previous Article in Special Issue
Improving Dignity of Care in Community-Dwelling Elderly Patients with Cognitive Decline and Their Caregivers. The Role of Dignity Therapy
Article

“Imagine You Have ALS”: Death Education to Prepare for Advance Treatment Directives

1
Department of Philosophy, Sociology, Pedagogy and Applied Psychology (FISPPA), University of Padova, 35131 Padova, Italy
2
Emili Sagol Creative Arts Therapies Research Center, University of Haifa, 3498838 Haifa, Israel
3
Unione Italiana Lotta alla Distrofia Muscolare (UILDM)—Milano Section, 20124 Milan, Italy
4
Department of Psychology, University of Klagenfurt, 9020 Klagenfurt am Wörthersee, Austria
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Behav. Sci. 2021, 11(1), 6; https://doi.org/10.3390/bs11010006
Received: 25 November 2020 / Revised: 30 December 2020 / Accepted: 1 January 2021 / Published: 6 January 2021
The study presents the results of qualitative research carried out within a death education project dedicated to advance treatment directives (ATDs) in which it was proposed to participants to empathize with people who had received a diagnosis of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS). The study involved 104 people who discussed and reflected on issues related to the knowledge of having to die, palliative care and ATDs, investigating what choices they would have made if they had received such a diagnosis. Finally, they were asked to write a paper describing their impressions and hypothetical choices. Qualitative analysis has elucidated among fundamental themes. Four thematic areas emerged from the data analysis: (1) ATDs and the family; (2) the importance of reducing pain and suffering; (3) emotions and considerations regarding death, illness and spirituality; and (4) opinions on the DeEd course. It has emerged that some people are unfamiliar with palliative care or the right to self-determination and that addressing these issues helps manage the thought of the future with less terror. The experience of death education has therefore proven to be very positive in dealing with complex and often censored issues, allowing thinking about death in a less distressing way. View Full-Text
Keywords: death education; community; advance treatment directives; amyotrophic lateral sclerosis death education; community; advance treatment directives; amyotrophic lateral sclerosis
MDPI and ACS Style

Testoni, I.; Palazzo, L.; Calamarà, N.; Rossi, G.; Wieser, M.A. “Imagine You Have ALS”: Death Education to Prepare for Advance Treatment Directives. Behav. Sci. 2021, 11, 6. https://doi.org/10.3390/bs11010006

AMA Style

Testoni I, Palazzo L, Calamarà N, Rossi G, Wieser MA. “Imagine You Have ALS”: Death Education to Prepare for Advance Treatment Directives. Behavioral Sciences. 2021; 11(1):6. https://doi.org/10.3390/bs11010006

Chicago/Turabian Style

Testoni, Ines, Lorenza Palazzo, Nicoletta Calamarà, Gabriella Rossi, and Michael A. Wieser. 2021. "“Imagine You Have ALS”: Death Education to Prepare for Advance Treatment Directives" Behavioral Sciences 11, no. 1: 6. https://doi.org/10.3390/bs11010006

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop