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Strangers, Friends, and Lovers Show Different Physiological Synchrony in Different Emotional States

1
Department of Psychology and Cognitive Science, University of Trento, 38068 Rovereto TN, Italy
2
Psychology Program, School of Social Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639818, Singapore
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Trinity College Institute of Neuroscience, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin 2, Ireland
4
National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Rockville, MD 20847, USA
5
Institute for Fiscal Studies, London WC1E 7AE, UK
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Behav. Sci. 2020, 10(1), 11; https://doi.org/10.3390/bs10010011
Received: 9 November 2019 / Revised: 17 December 2019 / Accepted: 18 December 2019 / Published: 22 December 2019
The mere copresence of another person synchronizes physiological signals, but no study has systematically investigated the effects of the type of emotional state and the type of relationship in eliciting dyadic physiological synchrony. In this study, we investigated the synchrony of pairs of strangers, companions, and romantic partners while watching a series of video clips designed to elicit different emotions. Maximal cross-correlation of heart rate variability (HRV) was used to quantify dyadic synchrony. The findings suggest that an existing social relationship might reduce the predisposition to conform one’s autonomic responses to a friend or romantic partner during social situations that do not require direct interaction. View Full-Text
Keywords: heart rate variability; dyads; physiological synchrony; relationship; emotion heart rate variability; dyads; physiological synchrony; relationship; emotion
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Bizzego, A.; Azhari, A.; Campostrini, N.; Truzzi, A.; Ng, L.Y.; Gabrieli, G.; Bornstein, M.H.; Setoh, P.; Esposito, G. Strangers, Friends, and Lovers Show Different Physiological Synchrony in Different Emotional States. Behav. Sci. 2020, 10, 11.

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