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Med. Sci. 2018, 6(3), 62; https://doi.org/10.3390/medsci6030062

Should Mumps Be Higher Up on the Public Health Agenda in India? A Concern for Global Health Security

1
Directorate of Health Services, Kashmir 190001, India
2
Global Health Research, 98 Temple Street, London E26QQ, UK
3
Department of Paraclinical Sciences, Faculty of Medical Sciences, The University of the West Indies, St. Augustine, Trinidad and Tobago
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 21 June 2018 / Revised: 1 August 2018 / Accepted: 1 August 2018 / Published: 7 August 2018
(This article belongs to the Section Immunology and Infectious Diseases)
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Abstract

Mumps is a public health problem on a global scale caused by mumps virus, a member of family paramyxoviridae. An effective form of vaccination exists and is incorporated into routine immunization schedules in over 100 countries, usually in the form of the Measles, Mumps and Rubella (MMR) vaccine. This is not the case in India, as mumps is not viewed as a significant enough public health problem by the government to warrant such an intervention. This original research paper discusses about outbreaks of mumps in Kashmir, India and aims to add to the body of literature to support the routine immunization with the mumps vaccine. From July to September 2017, there were 15 outbreaks and 260 cases of mumps recorded in the region by the Integrated Disease Surveillance Programme (IDSP). We conclude that the Indian Government should include the MMR vaccination in the Universal Immunization Programme. This would result in clinical and economic benefits by reducing outbreaks and associated morbidity of mumps, in addition to tackling the recognized morbidity and mortality of rubella and measles. To support the global health security, there is a great need to strengthen surveillance, adhere to the World Health Organization’s International Health Regulations (IHRs), and pay attention to emerging and re-emerging infectious agents, including paramyxovirus group. View Full-Text
Keywords: mumps; universal immunization programme; vaccination; disease surveillance; global health security; paramyxovirus mumps; universal immunization programme; vaccination; disease surveillance; global health security; paramyxovirus
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Kadri, S.M.; Rehman, S.-U.; Rehana, K.; Brady, A.H.; Chattu, V.K. Should Mumps Be Higher Up on the Public Health Agenda in India? A Concern for Global Health Security. Med. Sci. 2018, 6, 62.

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