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Establishment of a Greek Food Database for Palaeodiet Reconstruction: Case Study of Human and Fauna Remains from Neolithic to Late Bronze Age from Greece

1
Stable Isotope Unit, Institute of Nanoscience and nanotechnology, National Center of Scientific Research “Demokritos”, GR15310 Ag. Paraskevi Attikis, Greece
2
National Observatory of Athens, Institute of Environmental Research and Sustainable Development, I. Metaxa and V. Pavlou, GR15236 P. Pendeli, Greece
3
School of History, Classics and Archaeology, William Robertson Wing, University of Edinburgh, Old Medical Quad, Teviot Place, Edinburgh EH8 9AG, UK
4
Vasilissis Olgas 84B, 54643 Thessaloniki, Greece
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Geosciences 2019, 9(4), 165; https://doi.org/10.3390/geosciences9040165
Received: 10 February 2019 / Revised: 1 April 2019 / Accepted: 8 April 2019 / Published: 10 April 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Isotope Geochemistry)
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Abstract

We review the stable isotopic data of recovered Greek bones from the Early Neolithic to the Late Bronze period in order to examine dietary changes over time. As an isotopic baseline we use the published fauna data of the periods. The analysis revealed a diet that included a significant proportion of foods based on C3 plants, and the bulk of the animal protein must have been provided by terrestrial mammals with a small but detectable proportion of marine protein for coastal and island populations. A more significant contribution of marine protein is observed for Bronze Age populations while the enrichment in both C and N isotopes is connected, for some areas, to the introduction of millet during the Bronze Age, and to freshwater consumption. An extensive database of Greek food sources is presented and compared to the fauna from the prehistoric periods (Early Neolithic to Late Bronze Age) of the literature. We propose that this database can be used in palaeodiet reconstruction studies. View Full-Text
Keywords: stable isotopes; palaeodiet; carbon; nitrogen; bone collagen; Bronze Age; Neolithic; Ancient Greece stable isotopes; palaeodiet; carbon; nitrogen; bone collagen; Bronze Age; Neolithic; Ancient Greece
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Dotsika, E.; Diamantopoulos, G.; Lykoudis, S.; Gougoura, S.; Kranioti, E.; Karalis, P.; Michael, D.; Samartzidou, E.; Palaigeorgiou, E. Establishment of a Greek Food Database for Palaeodiet Reconstruction: Case Study of Human and Fauna Remains from Neolithic to Late Bronze Age from Greece. Geosciences 2019, 9, 165.

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