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Open AccessArticle

Organization of Bone Mineral: The Role of Mineral–Water Interactions

1
CNRS, Collège de France, Laboratoire de Chimie de la Matière Condensée de Paris (LCMCP), Sorbonne Université, 4 place Jussieu, F-75005 Paris, France
2
UMR 3528 and UTech UBI, Institut Pasteur, 28 rue du Docteur Roux, F-75015 Paris, France
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Current address: Trinity Centre for Bioengineering, Trinity Biomedical Sciences Institute, Trinity College Dublin (TCD), Dublin 2, D02 R590, Ireland.
Geosciences 2018, 8(12), 466; https://doi.org/10.3390/geosciences8120466
Received: 10 November 2018 / Revised: 29 November 2018 / Accepted: 1 December 2018 / Published: 8 December 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dynamics and Kinetics of Melt-Fluid-Rock Interactions)
The mechanism (s) that drive the organization of bone mineral throughout the bone extracellular matrix remain unclear. The long-standing theory implicates the organic matrix, namely specific non-collagenous proteins and/or collagen fibrils, while a recent theory proposes a self-assembly mechanism. Applying a combination of spectroscopic and microscopic techniques in wet and dry conditions to bone-like hydroxyapatite nanoparticles that were used as a proxy for bone mineral, we confirm that mature bone mineral particles have the capacity to self-assemble into organized structures. A large quantity of water is present at the surface of bone mineral due to the presence of a hydrophilic, amorphous surface layer that coats bone mineral nanoparticles. These water molecules must not only be strongly bound to the surface of bone mineral in the form of a rigid hydration shell, but they must also be trapped within the amorphous surface layer. Cohesive forces between these water molecules present at the mineral–mineral interface not only hold the mature bone mineral particles together, but also promote their oriented stacking. This intrinsic ability of mature bone mineral particles to organize themselves without recourse to the organic matrix forms the foundation for the development of the next generation of orthopedic biomaterials. View Full-Text
Keywords: bone mineral; bone biomineralization; bone hydroxyapatite; bone mineral organization; amorphous surface layer; solid-state NMR; cryogenic TEM; mineral–water interactions bone mineral; bone biomineralization; bone hydroxyapatite; bone mineral organization; amorphous surface layer; solid-state NMR; cryogenic TEM; mineral–water interactions
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Von Euw, S.; Chan-Chang, T.-H.-C.; Paquis, C.; Haye, B.; Pehau-Arnaudet, G.; Babonneau, F.; Azaïs, T.; Nassif, N. Organization of Bone Mineral: The Role of Mineral–Water Interactions. Geosciences 2018, 8, 466.

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