Next Article in Journal
Slope Failure in a Period of Increased Landslide Activity: Sennwald Rock Avalanche, Switzerland
Next Article in Special Issue
Geomorphologic Recovery of North Captiva Island from the Landfall of Hurricane Charley in 2004
Previous Article in Journal
Evolution of a Late Miocene Deep-Water Depositional System in the Southern Taranaki Basin, New Zealand
Previous Article in Special Issue
Understanding the Dynamics of a Coastal Lagoon: Drivers, Exchanges, State of the Environment, Consequences and Responses
Article

Storm Driven Migration of the Napatree Barrier, Rhode Island, USA

Department of Environmental Earth Science, Eastern Connecticut State University, Willimantic, CT 06226, USA
Academic Editors: Gianluigi Di Paola, Germán Rodríguez, Carmen M. Rosskopf and Jesus Martinez-Frias
Geosciences 2021, 11(8), 330; https://doi.org/10.3390/geosciences11080330
Received: 7 May 2021 / Revised: 27 July 2021 / Accepted: 31 July 2021 / Published: 5 August 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Shoreline Dynamics and Beach Erosion)
Napatree Point, an isolated barrier in southern Rhode Island, provides a case study of barrier spit migration via storm driven overwash and washover fan migration. Documented shoreline changes using historical surveys and vertical aerial photographs show that the barrier had little in the way of net change in position between 1883 and 1939, including the impact of the 1938 hurricane. The barrier retreated rapidly between 1945 and 1975, driven by both tropical and extra-tropical storms. The shoreline position has been largely static since 1975. The removal of the foredune during the 1938 hurricane facilitated landward shoreline migration in subsequent lower intensity storms. Dune recovery following the 1962 Ash Wednesday storm has been allowed due to limited overwash and barrier migration over the last several decades. Shoreline change rates during the period from 1945–1975 were more than double the rate of shoreline change between 1939 and 2014 and triple the rate between 1883 and 2014, exceeding the positional uncertainty of these shoreline pairs. The long-term shoreline change rates used to calculate coastal setbacks in Rhode Island likely underestimate the potential for rapid shoreline retreat over shorter time periods, particularly in a cluster of storm activity. While sea-level rise has increased since 1975, the barrier has not migrated, highlighting the importance of storms in barrier migration. View Full-Text
Keywords: barrier spit; overwash; barrier migration; shoreline change; hurricane; extra-tropical storm barrier spit; overwash; barrier migration; shoreline change; hurricane; extra-tropical storm
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Oakley, B.A. Storm Driven Migration of the Napatree Barrier, Rhode Island, USA. Geosciences 2021, 11, 330. https://doi.org/10.3390/geosciences11080330

AMA Style

Oakley BA. Storm Driven Migration of the Napatree Barrier, Rhode Island, USA. Geosciences. 2021; 11(8):330. https://doi.org/10.3390/geosciences11080330

Chicago/Turabian Style

Oakley, Bryan A. 2021. "Storm Driven Migration of the Napatree Barrier, Rhode Island, USA" Geosciences 11, no. 8: 330. https://doi.org/10.3390/geosciences11080330

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop