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Detecting and Mapping Gas Emission Craters on the Yamal and Gydan Peninsulas, Western Siberia
Article

New Catastrophic Gas Blowout and Giant Crater on the Yamal Peninsula in 2020: Results of the Expedition and Data Processing

1
Oil and Gas Research Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences (OGRI RAS), 3, Gubkina St., 119333 Moscow, Russia
2
Skolkovo Innovation Center, Skolkovo Institute of Science and Technology, 3 Nobel Street, 121205 Moscow, Russia
3
Non-profit partnership “Russian Center of Arctic Development”, 20, Respubliki st., 629007 Salekhard, Russia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Jesus Martinez-Frias and Michela Giustiniani
Geosciences 2021, 11(2), 71; https://doi.org/10.3390/geosciences11020071
Received: 22 December 2020 / Revised: 27 January 2021 / Accepted: 29 January 2021 / Published: 8 February 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Gas Emissions and Crater Formation in Arctic Permafrost)
This article describes the results of an Arctic expedition studying the new giant gas blowout crater in the north of Western Siberia, in the central part of the Yamal Peninsula in 2020. It was named C17 in the geoinformation system “Arctic and the World Ocean” created by the Oil and Gas Research Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences (OGRI RAS). On the basis of remote sensing, it can be seen that the formation of the crater C17 was preceded by a long-term growth of the perennial heaving mound (PHM) on the surface of the third marine terrace. Based on the interpretation of satellite images, it was substantiated that the crater C17 was formed in the period 15 May–9 June 2020. For the first time, as a result of aerial photography from inside the crater with a UAV, a 3D model of the crater and a giant cavity in the ground ice, formed during its thawing from below, was built. The accumulation of gas, the pressure rise and the development of gas-dynamic processes in the cavity led to the growth of the PHM, and the explosion and formation of the crater. View Full-Text
Keywords: Arctic; Yamal Peninsula; permafrost; perennial heave mounds (PHMs); pingo; underground cavity; gas blowout; gas explosion; crater; remote sensing (RS); unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV); digital elevation model (DEM); ArcticDEM Arctic; Yamal Peninsula; permafrost; perennial heave mounds (PHMs); pingo; underground cavity; gas blowout; gas explosion; crater; remote sensing (RS); unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV); digital elevation model (DEM); ArcticDEM
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MDPI and ACS Style

Bogoyavlensky, V.; Bogoyavlensky, I.; Nikonov, R.; Kargina, T.; Chuvilin, E.; Bukhanov, B.; Umnikov, A. New Catastrophic Gas Blowout and Giant Crater on the Yamal Peninsula in 2020: Results of the Expedition and Data Processing. Geosciences 2021, 11, 71. https://doi.org/10.3390/geosciences11020071

AMA Style

Bogoyavlensky V, Bogoyavlensky I, Nikonov R, Kargina T, Chuvilin E, Bukhanov B, Umnikov A. New Catastrophic Gas Blowout and Giant Crater on the Yamal Peninsula in 2020: Results of the Expedition and Data Processing. Geosciences. 2021; 11(2):71. https://doi.org/10.3390/geosciences11020071

Chicago/Turabian Style

Bogoyavlensky, Vasily, Igor Bogoyavlensky, Roman Nikonov, Tatiana Kargina, Evgeny Chuvilin, Boris Bukhanov, and Andrey Umnikov. 2021. "New Catastrophic Gas Blowout and Giant Crater on the Yamal Peninsula in 2020: Results of the Expedition and Data Processing" Geosciences 11, no. 2: 71. https://doi.org/10.3390/geosciences11020071

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