Next Article in Journal
Use of Hydrolyzed Chinese Gallnut Tannic Acid in Weaned Piglets as an Alternative to Zinc Oxide: Overview on the Gut Microbiota
Next Article in Special Issue
The Effect of Dietary Halloysite Supplementation on the Performance of Broiler Chickens and Broiler House Environmental Parameters
Previous Article in Journal
Development of Calibration Models to Predict Mean Fibre Diameter in Llama (Lama glama) Fleeces with Near Infrared Spectroscopy
Previous Article in Special Issue
Effects of Dietary Rapeseed Meal on Growth Performance, Carcass Traits, Serum Parameters, and Intestinal Development of Geese
Communication

Feeding Malic Acid to Chickens at Slaughter Age Improves Microbial Safety with Regard to Campylobacter

by 1,†, 2,†, 2, 2, 1,2,3 and 1,2,3,*
1
Jiangsu Key Lab of Zoonosis/Jiangsu Co-Innovation Center for Prevention and Control of Important Animal Infectious Diseases and Zoonoses, Yangzhou University, Wenhui East Road 48, Yangzhou 225009, China
2
Key Laboratory of Prevention and Control of Biological Hazard Factors (Animal Origin) for Agri-Food Safety and Quality, Ministry of Agriculture of China, Yangzhou University, Wenhui East Road 48, Yangzhou 225009, China
3
Joint International Research Laboratory of Agriculture and Agri-Product Safety, Yangzhou University, Wenhui East Road 48, Yangzhou 225009, China
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
These authors contributed equally.
Academic Editors: Paweł Konieczka and Dorota Bederska-Łojewska
Animals 2021, 11(7), 1999; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani11071999
Received: 17 June 2021 / Accepted: 28 June 2021 / Published: 5 July 2021
(This article belongs to the Collection Poultry Feeding and Gut Health)
Chicken meat has become a popular food that is consumed worldwide. However, chicken flocks suffer from Campylobacter infection during their rearing period. Campylobacter is the most serious pathogen colonizing chicken flocks which could be transmitted through the food chain and threaten public health. The traditional strategy of using antibiotics to inhibit pathogens in chicken flocks is no longer acceptable due to the increasing risk of antibiotic resistance. Thus, finding alternative antimicrobial agents has become a priority in recent years. In this study, malic acid was supplied to flocks in order to find an effective means of reducing the contamination of Campylobacter and to evaluate its potential effects on poultry production. By using malic acid-supplemented drinking water for 5 days before slaughtering, the Campylobacter carriage was significantly decreased in the treated group compared to the control group. Malic acid has no adverse effects on chickens, though it could change the composition of chicken meat by increasing the moisture content and decreasing the fat content and it could be applied as a potential antimicrobial agent in poultry production.
This study supplied malic acid-supplemented drinking water to flocks that were naturally Campylobacter-positive and assessed the effect of feeding malic acid to chickens on Campylobacter reduction and poultry production. In Experiment 1, chickens were provided with malic acid-supplemented drinking water for three weeks. The contamination loads of Campylobacter were decreased by 0.91–0.98 log after the first week of use (p < 0.05). However, this effect did not persist over time and significant decontamination could not be found in the second and third weeks of application. Thus, in Experiment 2 malic acid-supplemented drinking water was given to chickens for a period of five days at slaughter age. The Campylobacter carriage was found to be effectively decreased by 1.05–1.55 log (p < 0.05). Malic acid had no adverse effects on chicken body weight, weight gain, intestinal indices, or the microbiota. In addition, it could change the composition of chicken meat since the moisture content was increased by 5.12–5.92% (p < 0.05) and the fat content was decreased by 1.60% (p < 0.05). Our study provides an effective means for reducing the contamination of Campylobacter during the chicken rearing period and this method can be applied to promote the safe development of poultry farming and its products. View Full-Text
Keywords: poultry production; malic acid; Campylobacter; microbial safety poultry production; malic acid; Campylobacter; microbial safety
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Ren, F.; Yang, W.; Hu, J.; Huang, P.; Jiao, X.-A.; Huang, J. Feeding Malic Acid to Chickens at Slaughter Age Improves Microbial Safety with Regard to Campylobacter. Animals 2021, 11, 1999. https://doi.org/10.3390/ani11071999

AMA Style

Ren F, Yang W, Hu J, Huang P, Jiao X-A, Huang J. Feeding Malic Acid to Chickens at Slaughter Age Improves Microbial Safety with Regard to Campylobacter. Animals. 2021; 11(7):1999. https://doi.org/10.3390/ani11071999

Chicago/Turabian Style

Ren, Fangzhe, Wenbin Yang, Juanjuan Hu, Pingyu Huang, Xin-An Jiao, and Jinlin Huang. 2021. "Feeding Malic Acid to Chickens at Slaughter Age Improves Microbial Safety with Regard to Campylobacter" Animals 11, no. 7: 1999. https://doi.org/10.3390/ani11071999

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop