Next Article in Journal
Relationships between the Rider’s Pelvic Mobility and Balance on a Gymnastic Ball with Equestrian Skills and Effects on Horse Welfare
Next Article in Special Issue
Nitrergic and Substance P Immunoreactive Neurons in the Enteric Nervous System of the Bottlenose Dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) Intestine
Previous Article in Journal
In Vitro Assessment of Enteric Methane Emission Potential of Whole-Plant Barley, Oat, Triticale and Wheat
Previous Article in Special Issue
Emergence of Third-Generation Cephalosporin-Resistant Morganella morganii in a Captive Breeding Dolphin in South Korea
Article

Myoglobin Concentration and Oxygen Stores in Different Functional Muscle Groups from Three Small Cetacean Species

1
Atlantic Center for Cetacean Research, Institute of Animal Health and Food Safety (IUSA), Veterinary School, University of Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, C/Transmontaña s/n, 35413 Las Palmas, Spain
2
Department of Biology and Marine Biology, University of North Carolina Wilmington, 601 S. College Road, Wilmington, NC 28403, USA
3
Department of Mathematics, Campus de Tafira s/n, University of Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, 35017 Las Palmas, Spain
4
Biology Department, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Woods Hole, MA 02543, USA
5
International Fund for Animal Welfare, Yarmouth Port, MA 02675, USA
6
Global Diving Research Inc., Ottawa, ON K2J 5E8, Canada
7
Fundación Oceanogràphic, Department of Research, Ciutat de les Arts i de les Ciències, Carrer d’Eduardo Primo Yúfera, 1B, 46013 Valencia, Spain
8
Department of Life Sciences, Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi, 6300 Ocean Drive, Unit 5892, Corpus Christi, TX 78412, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Claudia Gili and Cinzia Centelleghe
Animals 2021, 11(2), 451; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani11020451
Received: 24 December 2020 / Revised: 30 January 2021 / Accepted: 2 February 2021 / Published: 9 February 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent advances in Marine Mammal Research)
Marine mammals display several physiological adaptations to their marine environment. Higher myoglobin concentrations in their muscles compared to terrestrial mammals allow them to increase their onboard oxygen stores, enhancing the time available to dive. Most previous studies have calculated cetaceans’ onboard oxygen stores by assuming the myoglobin concentration of a single muscle to be representative of all the muscles in the body. In this study, we analyzed this assumption by comparing it to a more precise method that weighs all body muscles and measures myoglobin concentration in different functional groups.
Compared with terrestrial mammals, marine mammals possess increased muscle myoglobin concentrations (Mb concentration, g Mb · 100g−1 muscle), enhancing their onboard oxygen (O2) stores and their aerobic dive limit. Although myoglobin is not homogeneously distributed, cetacean muscle O2 stores have been often determined by measuring Mb concentration from a single muscle sample (longissimus dorsi) and multiplying that value by the animal’s locomotor muscle or total muscle mass. This study serves to determine the accuracy of previous cetacean muscle O2 stores calculations. For that, body muscles from three delphinid species: Delphinus delphis, Stenella coeruleoalba, and Stenella frontalis, were dissected and weighed. Mb concentration was calculated from six muscles/muscle groups (epaxial, hypaxial and rectus abdominis; mastohumeralis; sternohyoideus; and dorsal scalenus), each representative of different functional groups (locomotion powering swimming, pectoral fin movement, feeding and respiration, respectively). Results demonstrated that the Mb concentration was heterogeneously distributed, being significantly higher in locomotor muscles. Locomotor muscles were the major contributors to total muscle O2 stores (mean 92.8%) due to their high Mb concentration and large muscle masses. Compared to this method, previous studies assuming homogenous Mb concentration distribution likely underestimated total muscle O2 stores by 10% when only considering locomotor muscles and overestimated them by 13% when total muscle mass was considered. View Full-Text
Keywords: D. delphis; S. coeruleoalba; S. frontalis; muscle mass; heterogeneity; aerobic dive limit D. delphis; S. coeruleoalba; S. frontalis; muscle mass; heterogeneity; aerobic dive limit
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Arregui, M.; Singleton, E.M.; Saavedra, P.; Pabst, D.A.; Moore, M.J.; Sierra, E.; Rivero, M.A.; Câmara, N.; Niemeyer, M.; Fahlman, A.; McLellan, W.A.; Bernaldo de Quirós, Y. Myoglobin Concentration and Oxygen Stores in Different Functional Muscle Groups from Three Small Cetacean Species. Animals 2021, 11, 451. https://doi.org/10.3390/ani11020451

AMA Style

Arregui M, Singleton EM, Saavedra P, Pabst DA, Moore MJ, Sierra E, Rivero MA, Câmara N, Niemeyer M, Fahlman A, McLellan WA, Bernaldo de Quirós Y. Myoglobin Concentration and Oxygen Stores in Different Functional Muscle Groups from Three Small Cetacean Species. Animals. 2021; 11(2):451. https://doi.org/10.3390/ani11020451

Chicago/Turabian Style

Arregui, Marina; Singleton, Emily M.; Saavedra, Pedro; Pabst, D. A.; Moore, Michael J.; Sierra, Eva; Rivero, Miguel A.; Câmara, Nakita; Niemeyer, Misty; Fahlman, Andreas; McLellan, William A.; Bernaldo de Quirós, Yara. 2021. "Myoglobin Concentration and Oxygen Stores in Different Functional Muscle Groups from Three Small Cetacean Species" Animals 11, no. 2: 451. https://doi.org/10.3390/ani11020451

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop