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Article

Highly Fermentable Fiber Alters Fecal Microbiota and Mitigates Swine Dysentery Induced by Brachyspira hyodysenteriae

1
Department of Animal Science, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011, USA
2
Department of Veterinary Diagnostic and Production Animal Medicine, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: M. Ángeles Latorre
Animals 2021, 11(2), 396; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani11020396
Received: 14 January 2021 / Accepted: 2 February 2021 / Published: 4 February 2021
Dietary manipulation to prevent disease is essential to reduce antimicrobial usage in the swine industry. This study aimed to evaluate whether replacing lowly fermentable fibers with highly fermentable fibers would mitigate disease during a 42 day Brachyspira hyodysenteriae challenge. Pigs fed the highly fermentable diet had improved growth performance compared with those fed diets of lower fermentability and had near absence of clinical swine dysentery. Further, several microbial genera were altered by dietary manipulation, bacteria that may be synergistic or antagonistic to Brachyspira hyodysenteriae. Taken together, this study demonstrates that replacing lowly fermentable fiber with highly fermentable fibers mitigates disease during Brachyspira hyodysenteriae challenge and may help reduce antimicrobial usage in treatment and control of this pathogen.
Brachyspira hyodysenteriae is an etiological agent of swine dysentery (SD). Diet fermentability plays a role in development of SD, but the mechanism(s) of action are largely unknown. Thus, this study aimed to determine whether replacing lowly fermentable fiber with highly fermentable fiber would mitigate a 42 d B. hyodysenteriae challenge. Thirty-nine barrows were allocated to dietary treatment groups: (1) 20% corn distillers dried grain with solubles (DDGS), 0% beet pulp (BP) or resistant starch (RS; lowly fermentable fiber (LFF)); (2) 10% DDGS, 5% BP, 5% RS (medium fermentable fiber (MFF)); and (3) 0% DDGS, 10% BP, 10% RS (highly fermentable fiber (HFF)). On day post inoculation 0, pigs were inoculated with B. hyodysenteriae. Overall, 85% LFF pigs developed clinical SD, 46% of MFF pigs developed SD, and 15% of HFF pigs developed SD (p < 0.05). Overall average daily gain (ADG) differed among all treatments (p < 0.001), with LFF pigs having the lowest ADG. For HFF pigs, ADG was 37% greater than LFF pigs (p < 0.001) and 19% greater than MFF pigs (p = 0.037). The LFF diet had greater relative abundance of Shuttleworthia and Ruminococcus torques. Further, microbiota of pigs that developed SD had enriched Prevotellaceae. Collectively, replacing DDGS with highly fermentable fiber reduced clinical SD, improved performance, and modulated fecal microbiota during B. hyodysenteriae challenge. View Full-Text
Keywords: pig; nutrition; fermentable fiber; insoluble fiber; Brachyspira hyodysenteriae; microbiota pig; nutrition; fermentable fiber; insoluble fiber; Brachyspira hyodysenteriae; microbiota
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MDPI and ACS Style

Helm, E.T.; Gabler, N.K.; Burrough, E.R. Highly Fermentable Fiber Alters Fecal Microbiota and Mitigates Swine Dysentery Induced by Brachyspira hyodysenteriae. Animals 2021, 11, 396. https://doi.org/10.3390/ani11020396

AMA Style

Helm ET, Gabler NK, Burrough ER. Highly Fermentable Fiber Alters Fecal Microbiota and Mitigates Swine Dysentery Induced by Brachyspira hyodysenteriae. Animals. 2021; 11(2):396. https://doi.org/10.3390/ani11020396

Chicago/Turabian Style

Helm, Emma T., Nicholas K. Gabler, and Eric. R. Burrough. 2021. "Highly Fermentable Fiber Alters Fecal Microbiota and Mitigates Swine Dysentery Induced by Brachyspira hyodysenteriae" Animals 11, no. 2: 396. https://doi.org/10.3390/ani11020396

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