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Review

Wild Felids Blood Group System

1
Department of Veterinary Sciences, University of Trás-os-Montes and Alto Douro (UTAD), Quinta de Prados, 5000-801 Vila Real, Portugal
2
Animal and Veterinary Research Centre (CECAV), University of Trás-os-Montes and Alto Douro (UTAD), Quinta de Prados, 5000-801 Vila Real, Portugal
3
Department de Medicinia i Cirurgia Animals, Facultat de Veterinària, Universititat Autònoma de Barcelona, Bellaterra, 08193 Barcelona, Spain
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Adrienne E. Crosier
Animals 2021, 11(12), 3533; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani11123533
Received: 9 November 2021 / Revised: 3 December 2021 / Accepted: 7 December 2021 / Published: 11 December 2021
(This article belongs to the Section Wildlife)
The AB blood group system has been identified in wild felids, as well as in the domestic cat. In both, type A blood seems to be the most common, although the majority of wild felid species exhibit one single blood type, showing that there seems to be variation between species, but not within species, and no evidence of geographical variation was yet found, showing apparently no genetic variability. Further studies are necessary to determine the clinical relevance of the AB blood group on wild felids. This manuscript makes a complete and comprehensive review of the knowledge on wild felids blood groups and transfusion medicine.
Wild felids and domestic cats share the AB blood group. However, there have been few studies regarding the characterization and prevalence of the different blood types in wild animals. The erythrocyte membrane glycolipids of the wild cats correspond to the major disialoganglioside patterns observed in domestic cats. Like in domestic cats, type A blood seems to be the most common, although wild felid species seem to exhibit one single blood type. Of the species studied, the wild domestic cats, and the Panthera and ocelot lineages, all had type A blood; the Puma lineage showed almost exclusively type B blood. The prevalence of wild felids blood types show that there seems to be variation between species, but not within species, and no evidence of geographical variation has yet been found, showing apparently no genetic variability. The presence of alloantibodies has also been demonstrated, so the risk of life-threatening transfusion reactions due to mismatched transfusions and neonatal isoerythrolysis is a possibility. Like in other species, the recognition of wild felids blood groups is clinically relevant, as it can also be important in establishing phylogenetic relationships within the Felidae family. We will review the current knowledge on this topic and give insights into the wild felids blood groups potential for zoo transfusion medicine and phylogenetic studies in order to help support reintroduction projects and to preserve genetic diversity. View Full-Text
Keywords: wild felids; blood type; cat; alloantibody; blood transfusion wild felids; blood type; cat; alloantibody; blood transfusion
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MDPI and ACS Style

Silvestre-Ferreira, A.; Pastor, J. Wild Felids Blood Group System. Animals 2021, 11, 3533. https://doi.org/10.3390/ani11123533

AMA Style

Silvestre-Ferreira A, Pastor J. Wild Felids Blood Group System. Animals. 2021; 11(12):3533. https://doi.org/10.3390/ani11123533

Chicago/Turabian Style

Silvestre-Ferreira, Ana, and Josep Pastor. 2021. "Wild Felids Blood Group System" Animals 11, no. 12: 3533. https://doi.org/10.3390/ani11123533

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