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Article

Interactions between Egg Storage Duration and Breeder Age on Selected Egg Quality, Hatching Results, and Chicken Quality

1
Laboratory LMMA and UCAR, Department of Animal Sciences, National Agronomic Institute of Tunisia, University of Carthage-Tunisia, 43 Avenue Charles Nicolle, Tunis 1082, Tunisia
2
Adaptation Physiology Group, Wageningen University, P.O. Box 338, 6700 AH Wageningen, The Netherlands
3
National School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Manouba-Tunisia, Ariana, Sidi Thabet 2020, Tunisia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Animals 2020, 10(10), 1719; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani10101719
Received: 18 June 2020 / Revised: 29 July 2020 / Accepted: 17 September 2020 / Published: 23 September 2020
(This article belongs to the Collection Current Advances in Poultry Research)
Egg storage duration and breeder age are two important factors influencing productivity and profitability of hatcheries. These factors probably interact with each other to influence egg quality, apparent fertility, hatchability, and hatchling quality. The aim of this study was to investigate interactions between egg storage duration and broiler breeder age on these parameters. It was demonstrated that eggs from young breeders were the most resistant to storage duration increase in relationship to early and middle embryonic mortality than eggs from older breeders. However, the opposite was found for hatchling quality, where yolk free body mass, which increased from young to old breeders after five days of storage, increased only from middle to old breeders after prolonged storage (19 days). The intestine percentage decreased also after long storage in younger breeders, but in older breeders no significant effect of egg storage duration was found.
Egg storage duration and breeder age are probably interacting to influence egg quality, hatchability, and hatchling quality. To evaluate this interaction, the impact of breeder age (31, 42, 66 weeks) and storage duration (2, 5, 12, 19 days) was investigated on broiler breeder eggs (Arbor Acres). Thick albumen diameter and pH increased, and yolk dry matter decreased between 2 and 19 days of storage. With the increase of breeder age from 31 to 66 weeks, albumen height, percentage and dry matter and shell percentage decreased and the egg weight and yolk percentage, dry matter and diameter increased. Prolonged egg storage increased the yolk pH in all breeder ages, but earlier and steeper in the oldest breeders. Prolonged egg storage resulted in a lower hatchability of set and fertile eggs due to a higher percentage of embryonic mortality. Early mortality increased earlier and steeper with prolonged egg storage in the oldest compared to younger breeders. Between 5 and 19 days of storage, yolk free body mass, liver and proventriculus + gizzard percentages decreased, as well as hatchling length and yolk efficiency (yolk absorption per initial yolk weight). The latter effects were most pronounced in the younger than in the older breeders. Therefore, eggs are preferably stored shorter than 7 d, but if long storage (≥12 days) cannot be avoided, we recommend to store eggs of older breeders when egg quality and hatchability are most important. In case hatchling quality is most important, it would be better to store eggs of younger breeders (31 weeks) for a prolonged period. View Full-Text
Keywords: storage duration; breeder age; egg weight loss; hatchability; hatchling quality storage duration; breeder age; egg weight loss; hatchability; hatchling quality
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MDPI and ACS Style

Nasri, H.; van den Brand, H.; Najar, T.; Bouzouaia, M. Interactions between Egg Storage Duration and Breeder Age on Selected Egg Quality, Hatching Results, and Chicken Quality. Animals 2020, 10, 1719. https://doi.org/10.3390/ani10101719

AMA Style

Nasri H, van den Brand H, Najar T, Bouzouaia M. Interactions between Egg Storage Duration and Breeder Age on Selected Egg Quality, Hatching Results, and Chicken Quality. Animals. 2020; 10(10):1719. https://doi.org/10.3390/ani10101719

Chicago/Turabian Style

Nasri, Hedia, Henry van den Brand, Taha Najar, and Moncef Bouzouaia. 2020. "Interactions between Egg Storage Duration and Breeder Age on Selected Egg Quality, Hatching Results, and Chicken Quality" Animals 10, no. 10: 1719. https://doi.org/10.3390/ani10101719

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