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Open AccessArticle

Dietary Supplementation with Flammulina velutipes Stem Waste on Growth Performance, Fecal Short Chain Fatty Acids and Serum Profile in Weaned Piglets

1
Institute of Mycology, Engineering Research Center of Chinese Ministry of Education for Edible and Medicinal Fungi, Jilin Agricultural University, Changchun 130118, China
2
State Key Laboratory of Animal Nutrition, Ministry of Agriculture Feed Industry Centre, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100193, China
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Animals 2020, 10(1), 82; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani10010082
Received: 4 December 2019 / Revised: 30 December 2019 / Accepted: 31 December 2019 / Published: 3 January 2020
Flammulina velutipes stem waste (FVS) is the by-product of Flammulina velutipes (FV), which is rich in amino acids, vitamins and trace minerals. The direct disposal of FVS can cause serious environmental pollution. Therefore, the objective of this study was to determine the utilization and effects of FVS in diets for weaned piglets. Effective utilization of FVS can avoid the waste of resources, and have direct positive effects on environmental pollution reduction.
This study was conducted to evaluate the effects of dietary FVS supplementation on growth performance, nutrient digestibility, biochemical profile of serum and fecal short chain fatty acids (SCFAs) production in weaned piglets. In Exp.1, 150 weaned pigs (initial body weight: 6.89 ± 1.17 kg) were allotted to five dietary treatments. The treatment diets included a basal diet and four experimental diets supplemented with 2.5%, 5.0%, 7.5% and 10.0% FVS respectively. The animal trial lasted for 28 days. In Exp.2, 72 piglets (initial body weight: 8.20 ± 1.67 kg) were allotted to three dietary treatments. The treatment diets included a basal diet and two experimental diets supplemented with 1.5% and 3.0% FVS, respectively. The animal trial lasted for 56 days. The results showed that pigs fed dietary FVS with 3% or lower inclusion levels had no significant difference (p > 0.10) on growth performance compared with pigs fed the control diet during day 1–28 and day 1–56. Dietary FVS supplementation decreased the apparent total tract digestibility (ATTD) of nutrients on day 28, day 35 and day 56, but no significant changes (p > 0.05) of nutrient digestibility were observed on day 14. Although piglets fed diets with higher levels of FVS showed impaired growth performance and ATTD of nutrients, dietary FVS supplementation improved the fecal SCFA production, antioxidant capacity, interleukin-2 and growth hormone levels in serum, and reduced the harmful low-density lipoprotein levels in serum on day 56. In conclusion, as a promising alternative fibrous ingredient, FVS could be supplemented in diets of weaned piglets with a proportion under 3%. View Full-Text
Keywords: Flammulina velutipes stem waste; growth performance; short chain fatty acid; weaned piglets Flammulina velutipes stem waste; growth performance; short chain fatty acid; weaned piglets
MDPI and ACS Style

Liu, X.; Zhao, J.; Zhang, G.; Hu, J.; Liu, L.; Piao, X.; Zhang, S.; Li, Y. Dietary Supplementation with Flammulina velutipes Stem Waste on Growth Performance, Fecal Short Chain Fatty Acids and Serum Profile in Weaned Piglets. Animals 2020, 10, 82.

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