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Lactobacillus Mucosae Strain Promoted by a High-Fiber Diet in Genetic Obese Child Alleviates Lipid Metabolism and Modifies Gut Microbiota in ApoE-/- Mice on a Western Diet

1
State Key Laboratory of Microbial Metabolism, School of Life Sciences and Biotechnology, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240, China
2
Department of Biochemistry and Microbiology and New Jersey Institute for Food, Nutrition and Health, School of Environmental and Biological Sciences, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ 08901, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Microorganisms 2020, 8(8), 1225; https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms8081225
Received: 17 July 2020 / Revised: 3 August 2020 / Accepted: 5 August 2020 / Published: 12 August 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Human Gut Microbiome, Diets and Health)
Supplementation of probiotics is a promising gut microbiota-targeted therapeutic method for hyperlipidemia and atherosclerosis. However, the selection of probiotic candidate strains is still empirical. Here, we obtained a human-derived strain, Lactobacillus mucosae A1, which was shown by metagenomic analysis to be promoted by a high-fiber diet and associated with the amelioration of host hyperlipidemia, and validated its effect on treating hyperlipidemia and atherosclerosis as well as changing structure of gut microbiota in ApoE-/- mice on a Western diet. L. mucosae A1 attenuated the severe lipid accumulation in serum, liver and aortic sinus of ApoE-/- mice on a Western diet, while it also reduced the serum lipopolysaccharide-binding protein content of mice, reflecting the improved metabolic endotoxemia. In addition, L. mucosae A1 shifted the gut microbiota structure of ApoE-/- mice on a Western diet, including recovering a few members of gut microbiota enhanced by the Western diet. This study not only suggests the potential of L. mucosae A1 to be a probiotic in the treatment of hyperlipidemia and atherosclerosis, but also highlights the advantage of such function-based rather than taxonomy-based strategies for the selection of candidate strains for the next generation probiotics. View Full-Text
Keywords: lactobacillus mucosae; human-derived probiotics; next generation probiotics; gut microbiota; lipid metabolism; atherosclerosis; ApoE-/- mice lactobacillus mucosae; human-derived probiotics; next generation probiotics; gut microbiota; lipid metabolism; atherosclerosis; ApoE-/- mice
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MDPI and ACS Style

Jiang, T.; Wu, H.; Yang, X.; Li, Y.; Zhang, Z.; Chen, F.; Zhao, L.; Zhang, C. Lactobacillus Mucosae Strain Promoted by a High-Fiber Diet in Genetic Obese Child Alleviates Lipid Metabolism and Modifies Gut Microbiota in ApoE-/- Mice on a Western Diet. Microorganisms 2020, 8, 1225. https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms8081225

AMA Style

Jiang T, Wu H, Yang X, Li Y, Zhang Z, Chen F, Zhao L, Zhang C. Lactobacillus Mucosae Strain Promoted by a High-Fiber Diet in Genetic Obese Child Alleviates Lipid Metabolism and Modifies Gut Microbiota in ApoE-/- Mice on a Western Diet. Microorganisms. 2020; 8(8):1225. https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms8081225

Chicago/Turabian Style

Jiang, Tianyi; Wu, Huan; Yang, Xin; Li, Yue; Zhang, Ziyi; Chen, Feng; Zhao, Liping; Zhang, Chenhong. 2020. "Lactobacillus Mucosae Strain Promoted by a High-Fiber Diet in Genetic Obese Child Alleviates Lipid Metabolism and Modifies Gut Microbiota in ApoE-/- Mice on a Western Diet" Microorganisms 8, no. 8: 1225. https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms8081225

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