Next Article in Journal
Molecular Ecology of Isoprene-Degrading Bacteria
Previous Article in Journal
Multiple Routes of Bluetongue Virus Egress
Article

In Silico Comparison Shows that the Pan-Genome of a Dairy-Related Bacterial Culture Collection Covers Most Reactions Annotated to Human Microbiomes

1
Interfaculty Bioinformatics Unit, University of Bern, Baltzerstrasse 6, CH-3012 Bern, Switzerland
2
Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics, University of Bern, CH-3012 Bern, Switzerland
3
Agroscope, Schwarzenburgstrasse 161, CH-3003 Bern, Switzerland
4
Department for Biomedical Research (DBMR), University Clinic for Visceral Surgery and Medicine, Bern University Hospital, University of Bern, Murtenstrasse 35, CH-3008 Bern, Switzerland
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Microorganisms 2020, 8(7), 966; https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms8070966
Received: 18 May 2020 / Revised: 23 June 2020 / Accepted: 25 June 2020 / Published: 27 June 2020
(This article belongs to the Section Food Microbiology)
The diversity of the human microbiome is positively associated with human health. However, this diversity is endangered by Westernized dietary patterns that are characterized by a decreased nutrient variety. Diversity might potentially be improved by promoting dietary patterns rich in microbial strains. Various collections of bacterial cultures resulting from a century of dairy research are readily available worldwide, and could be exploited to contribute towards this end. We have conducted a functional in silico analysis of the metagenome of 24 strains, each representing one of the species in a bacterial culture collection composed of 626 sequenced strains, and compared the pathways potentially covered by this metagenome to the intestinal metagenome of four healthy, although overweight, humans. Remarkably, the pan-genome of the 24 strains covers 89% of the human gut microbiome’s annotated enzymatic reactions. Furthermore, the dairy microbial collection covers biological pathways, such as methylglyoxal degradation, sulfate reduction, γ-aminobutyric (GABA) acid degradation and salicylate degradation, which are differently covered among the four subjects and are involved in a range of cardiometabolic, intestinal, and neurological disorders. We conclude that microbial culture collections derived from dairy research have the genomic potential to complement and restore functional redundancy in human microbiomes. View Full-Text
Keywords: dairy microbiome; human gut microbiome; diversity; health dairy microbiome; human gut microbiome; diversity; health
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

MDPI and ACS Style

Roder, T.; Wüthrich, D.; Bär, C.; Sattari, Z.; von Ah, U.; Ronchi, F.; Macpherson, A.J.; Ganal-Vonarburg, S.C.; Bruggmann, R.; Vergères, G. In Silico Comparison Shows that the Pan-Genome of a Dairy-Related Bacterial Culture Collection Covers Most Reactions Annotated to Human Microbiomes. Microorganisms 2020, 8, 966. https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms8070966

AMA Style

Roder T, Wüthrich D, Bär C, Sattari Z, von Ah U, Ronchi F, Macpherson AJ, Ganal-Vonarburg SC, Bruggmann R, Vergères G. In Silico Comparison Shows that the Pan-Genome of a Dairy-Related Bacterial Culture Collection Covers Most Reactions Annotated to Human Microbiomes. Microorganisms. 2020; 8(7):966. https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms8070966

Chicago/Turabian Style

Roder, Thomas; Wüthrich, Daniel; Bär, Cornelia; Sattari, Zahra; von Ah, Ueli; Ronchi, Francesca; Macpherson, Andrew J.; Ganal-Vonarburg, Stephanie C.; Bruggmann, Rémy; Vergères, Guy. 2020. "In Silico Comparison Shows that the Pan-Genome of a Dairy-Related Bacterial Culture Collection Covers Most Reactions Annotated to Human Microbiomes" Microorganisms 8, no. 7: 966. https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms8070966

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop