Next Article in Journal
Ivermectin Does Not Protect against SARS-CoV-2 Infection in the Syrian Hamster Model
Next Article in Special Issue
Antimicrobial Resistance and Antimicrobial Activity of Staphylococcus lugdunensis Obtained from Two Spanish Hospitals
Previous Article in Journal
Quorum Quenching Strains Isolated from the Microbiota of Sea Anemones and Holothurians Attenuate Vibriocorallilyticus Virulence Factors and Reduce Mortality in Artemiasalina
Previous Article in Special Issue
High Frequency of the EMRSA-15 Clone (ST22-MRSA-IV) in Hospital Wastewater
 
 
Article

High-Resolution Genotyping Unveils Identical Ampicillin-Resistant Enterococcus faecium Strains in Different Sources and Countries: A One Health Approach

1
Laboratory of Microbiology, UCIBIO—Applied Molecular Biosciences Unit, REQUIMTE, Department of Biological Sciences, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Porto, 4050-313 Porto, Portugal
2
Associate Laboratory i4HB-Institute for Health and Bioeconomy, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Porto, 4050-313 Porto, Portugal
3
TOXRUN—Toxicology Research Unit, University Institute of Health Sciences, CESPU, CRL, 4585-116 Gandra, Portugal
4
Grupo de Investigación Biomédica en Sepsis-BioSepsis, Hospital Universitario Río Hortega, Instituto de Investigación Biomédica de Salamanca (IBSAL), 47012 Valladollid, Spain
5
Tunisian Institute of Veterinary Research, University of Tunis El Manar, Tunis 1006, Tunisia
6
Laboratory of Treatment and Valorisation of Wastewater, Centre of Research and Water Technologies (CERTE), Technopark of Borj-Cédria, Soliman 8020, Tunisia
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Elisabeth Grohmann
Microorganisms 2022, 10(3), 632; https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms10030632
Received: 14 February 2022 / Revised: 7 March 2022 / Accepted: 10 March 2022 / Published: 16 March 2022
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nosocomial Pathogens and Antibiotic Resistance)
Multidrug-resistant (MDR) Enterococcus faecium (Efm) infections continue to increase worldwide, although epidemiological studies remain scarce in lower middle-income countries. We aimed to explore which strains circulate in E. faecium causing human infections in Tunisian healthcare institutions in order to compare them with strains from non-human sources of the same country and finally to position them within the global E. faecium epidemiology by genomic analysis. Antibiotic susceptibility testing was performed and transfer of vancomycin-vanA and ampicillin-pbp5 resistance was performed by conjugation. WGS-Illumina was performed on Tunisian strains, and these genomes were compared with Efm genomes from other regions present in the GenBank/NCBI database (n = 10,701 Efm genomes available May 2021). A comparison of phenotypes with those predicted by the recent ResFinder 4.1-CGE webtool unveiled a concordance of 88%, with discordant cases being discussed. cgMLST revealed three clusters [ST18/CT222 (n = 13), ST17/CT948 strains (n = 6), and ST203/CT184 (n = 3)], including isolates from clinical, healthy-human, retail meat, and/or environmental sources in different countries over large time spans (10–12 years). Isolates within each cluster showed similar antibiotic resistance, bacteriocin, and virulence genetic patterns. pbp5-AmpR was transferred by VanA-AmpR-ST80 (clinical) and AmpR-ST17-Efm (bovine meat). Identical chromosomal pbp5-platforms carrying metabolic/virulence genes were identified between ST17/ST18 strains of clinical, farm animal, and retail meat sources. The overall results emphasize the role of high-resolution genotyping as provided by WGS in depicting the dispersal of MDR-Efm strains carrying relevant adaptive traits across different hosts/regions and the need of a One Health task force to curtail their spread. View Full-Text
Keywords: Enterococcus faecium; hospital; ampicillin resistance; surveillance; genomics; One Health Enterococcus faecium; hospital; ampicillin resistance; surveillance; genomics; One Health
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Freitas, A.R.; Tedim, A.P.; Almeida-Santos, A.C.; Duarte, B.; Elghaieb, H.; Abbassi, M.S.; Hassen, A.; Novais, C.; Peixe, L. High-Resolution Genotyping Unveils Identical Ampicillin-Resistant Enterococcus faecium Strains in Different Sources and Countries: A One Health Approach. Microorganisms 2022, 10, 632. https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms10030632

AMA Style

Freitas AR, Tedim AP, Almeida-Santos AC, Duarte B, Elghaieb H, Abbassi MS, Hassen A, Novais C, Peixe L. High-Resolution Genotyping Unveils Identical Ampicillin-Resistant Enterococcus faecium Strains in Different Sources and Countries: A One Health Approach. Microorganisms. 2022; 10(3):632. https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms10030632

Chicago/Turabian Style

Freitas, Ana R., Ana P. Tedim, Ana C. Almeida-Santos, Bárbara Duarte, Houyem Elghaieb, Mohamed S. Abbassi, Abdennaceur Hassen, Carla Novais, and Luísa Peixe. 2022. "High-Resolution Genotyping Unveils Identical Ampicillin-Resistant Enterococcus faecium Strains in Different Sources and Countries: A One Health Approach" Microorganisms 10, no. 3: 632. https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms10030632

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop