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Open AccessArticle

LC-QTOF-MS and 1H NMR Metabolomics Verifies Potential Use of Greater Omentum for Klebsiella pneumoniae Biofilm Eradication in Rats

1
Department of Pharmaceutical and Biopharmaceutical Analysis, Medical University of Bialystok, 15-089 Bialystok, Poland
2
Faculty of Chemistry, Opole University, 45-040 Opole, Poland
3
Department of Chemistry, Wroclaw University of Technology, 50-370 Wroclaw, Poland
4
Department of Vascular, General and Transplantation Surgery, Wroclaw Medical University, 50-367 Wroclaw, Poland
5
Department of Pharmaceutical Microbiology and Parasitology, Wroclaw Medical University, 50-367 Wroclaw, Poland
6
Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Medical University of Bialystok, 15-089 Bialystok, Poland
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Pathogens 2020, 9(5), 399; https://doi.org/10.3390/pathogens9050399
Received: 23 April 2020 / Revised: 17 May 2020 / Accepted: 18 May 2020 / Published: 21 May 2020
(This article belongs to the Section Human Pathogens)
Bacterial wound infections are a common problem associated with surgical interventions. In particular, biofilm-forming bacteria are hard to eradicate, and alternative methods of treatment based on covering wounds with vascularized flaps of tissue are being developed. The greater omentum is a complex organ covering the intestines in the abdomen, which support wound recovery following surgical procedures and exhibit natural antimicrobial activity that could improve biofilm eradication. We investigated changes in rats’ metabolome following Klebsiella pneumoniae infections, as well as the greater omentum’s ability for Klebsiella pneumoniae biofilm eradication. Rats received either sterile implants or implants covered with Klebsiella pneumoniae biofilm (placed in the peritoneum or greater omentum). Metabolic profiles were monitored at days 0, 2, and 5 after surgery using combined proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR) and high performance liquid chromatography quadrupole time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry (LC–QTOF-MS) measurements of urine samples followed by chemometric analysis. Obtained results indicated that grafting of the sterile implant to the greater omentum did not cause major disturbances in rats’ metabolism, whereas the sterile implant located in the peritoneum triggered metabolic perturbations related to tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, as well as choline, tryptophan, and hippurate metabolism. Presence of implants colonized with Klebsiella pneumoniae biofilm resulted in similar levels of metabolic perturbations in both locations. Our findings confirmed that surgical procedures utilizing the greater omentum may have a practical use in wound healing and tissue regeneration in the future. View Full-Text
Keywords: metabolomics; Klebsiella pneumoniae; microbial biofilm eradication; surgery; implants metabolomics; Klebsiella pneumoniae; microbial biofilm eradication; surgery; implants
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Teul, J.; Deja, S.; Celińska-Janowicz, K.; Ząbek, A.; Młynarz, P.; Barć, P.; Junka, A.; Smutnicka, D.; Bartoszewicz, M.; Pałka, J.; Miltyk, W. LC-QTOF-MS and 1H NMR Metabolomics Verifies Potential Use of Greater Omentum for Klebsiella pneumoniae Biofilm Eradication in Rats. Pathogens 2020, 9, 399.

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