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Article

Prevalence, Intensity, and Correlates of Soil-Transmitted Helminth Infections among School Children after a Decade of Preventive Chemotherapy in Western Rwanda

1
Department of Laboratory Medicine, Division of Clinical Pharmacology, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital Huddinge,14186 Stockholm, Sweden
2
Rwanda Food and Drugs Authority, Nyarutarama Plaza, KG 9 Avenue Kigali, Rwanda
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College of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Rwanda, KK 737 Kigali, Rwanda
4
Neglected Tropical Disease and Other Parasitic Disease Unit, Rwanda Biomedical Center, KG 17 Ave Kigali, Rwanda
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Pathogens 2020, 9(12), 1076; https://doi.org/10.3390/pathogens9121076
Received: 2 December 2020 / Revised: 16 December 2020 / Accepted: 17 December 2020 / Published: 21 December 2020
(This article belongs to the Section Human Pathogens)
Preventive chemotherapy (PC) is a WHO-recommended core intervention measures to eliminate Soil-Transmitted Helminths (STH) as a public health problem by 2020, defined as a reduction in prevalence to <1% of moderate or high-intensity infection. We conducted a cross-sectional study to investigate the prevalence, intensity, and correlates of STH after a decade of PC in Rwanda. A total of 4998 school children (5–15 years old) from four districts along Lake Kivu in the western province were screened for STH using Kato-Katz. The overall prevalence of Soil-transmitted helminths among school children was 77.7% (range between districts = 54% to 92%). Trichirus trichiura was the most common STH (66.8%, range between districts = 23% to 88.2%), followed by Ascaris lumbricoides (49.9%, range between district = 28.5% to 63.3%) and hookworms (1.9%, range between districts = 0.6% to 2.9%). The prevalence of single, double and of triple parasite coinfection were 48.6%, 50.3%, and 1.1%, respectively. The overall prevalence of moderate or high-intensity infection for Trichirus trichiura and Ascaris lumbricoides was 7.1% and 13.9, respectively. Multivariate logistic regression model revealed that male sex, district, stunting, and schistosomiasis coinfection as significant predictors of STH infection. Despite a decade of PC implementation, STH remain a significant public health problem in Rwanda. View Full-Text
Keywords: mass drug administration; preventive chemotherapy; neglected tropical diseases; intestinal soil-transmitted helminths; prevalence; school children; Rwanda mass drug administration; preventive chemotherapy; neglected tropical diseases; intestinal soil-transmitted helminths; prevalence; school children; Rwanda
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MDPI and ACS Style

Kabatende, J.; Mugisha, M.; Ntirenganya, L.; Barry, A.; Ruberanziza, E.; Mbonigaba, J.B.; Bergman, U.; Bienvenu, E.; Aklillu, E. Prevalence, Intensity, and Correlates of Soil-Transmitted Helminth Infections among School Children after a Decade of Preventive Chemotherapy in Western Rwanda. Pathogens 2020, 9, 1076. https://doi.org/10.3390/pathogens9121076

AMA Style

Kabatende J, Mugisha M, Ntirenganya L, Barry A, Ruberanziza E, Mbonigaba JB, Bergman U, Bienvenu E, Aklillu E. Prevalence, Intensity, and Correlates of Soil-Transmitted Helminth Infections among School Children after a Decade of Preventive Chemotherapy in Western Rwanda. Pathogens. 2020; 9(12):1076. https://doi.org/10.3390/pathogens9121076

Chicago/Turabian Style

Kabatende, Joseph, Michael Mugisha, Lazare Ntirenganya, Abbie Barry, Eugene Ruberanziza, Jean B. Mbonigaba, Ulf Bergman, Emile Bienvenu, and Eleni Aklillu. 2020. "Prevalence, Intensity, and Correlates of Soil-Transmitted Helminth Infections among School Children after a Decade of Preventive Chemotherapy in Western Rwanda" Pathogens 9, no. 12: 1076. https://doi.org/10.3390/pathogens9121076

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