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Mediterranean Aquaculture in a Changing Climate: Temperature Effects on Pathogens and Diseases of Three Farmed Fish Species

1
Hellenic Centre for Marine Research, Institute of Marine Biology, Biotechnology and Aquaculture, 71500 Heraklion, Greece
2
Department of Biology, University of Crete, 71003 Heraklion, Greece
3
Biology Center of Czech Academy of Sciences, Laboratory of Functional Helminthology, Institute of Parasitology, 370 05 Ceske Budejovice, Czech Republic
4
Vaccines and Diagnostics, Moredun Research Institute, Pentlands Science Park, Bush Loan, Penicuik, Midlothian EH26 0PZ, UK
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Uwe Fischer
Pathogens 2021, 10(9), 1205; https://doi.org/10.3390/pathogens10091205
Received: 9 August 2021 / Revised: 3 September 2021 / Accepted: 13 September 2021 / Published: 16 September 2021
Climate change is expected to have a drastic effect on aquaculture worldwide. As we move forward with the agenda to increase and diversify aquaculture production, rising temperatures will have a progressively relevant impact on fish farming, linked to a multitude of issues associated with fish welfare. Temperature affects the physiology of both fish and pathogens, and has the potential to lead to significant increases in disease outbreaks within aquaculture systems, resulting in severe financial impacts. Significant shifts in future temperature regimes are projected for the Mediterranean Sea. We therefore aim to review and discuss the existing knowledge relating to disease outbreaks in the context of climate change in Mediterranean finfish aquaculture. The objective is to describe the effects of temperature on the physiology of both fish and pathogens, and moreover to list and discuss the principal diseases of the three main fish species farmed in the Mediterranean, namely gilthead seabream (Sparus aurata), European seabass (Dicentrarchus labrax), and meagre (Argyrosomus regius). We will attempt to link the pathology of each disease to a specific temperature range, while discussing potential future disease threats associated with the available climate change trends for the Mediterranean Sea. View Full-Text
Keywords: climate change; fish diseases; Mediterranean Sea; seabass; seabream; meagre climate change; fish diseases; Mediterranean Sea; seabass; seabream; meagre
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MDPI and ACS Style

Cascarano, M.C.; Stavrakidis-Zachou, O.; Mladineo, I.; Thompson, K.D.; Papandroulakis, N.; Katharios, P. Mediterranean Aquaculture in a Changing Climate: Temperature Effects on Pathogens and Diseases of Three Farmed Fish Species. Pathogens 2021, 10, 1205. https://doi.org/10.3390/pathogens10091205

AMA Style

Cascarano MC, Stavrakidis-Zachou O, Mladineo I, Thompson KD, Papandroulakis N, Katharios P. Mediterranean Aquaculture in a Changing Climate: Temperature Effects on Pathogens and Diseases of Three Farmed Fish Species. Pathogens. 2021; 10(9):1205. https://doi.org/10.3390/pathogens10091205

Chicago/Turabian Style

Cascarano, Maria C., Orestis Stavrakidis-Zachou, Ivona Mladineo, Kim D. Thompson, Nikos Papandroulakis, and Pantelis Katharios. 2021. "Mediterranean Aquaculture in a Changing Climate: Temperature Effects on Pathogens and Diseases of Three Farmed Fish Species" Pathogens 10, no. 9: 1205. https://doi.org/10.3390/pathogens10091205

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