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Humanities 2019, 8(2), 65; https://doi.org/10.3390/h8020065

Nomadic Narrative in Charlotte Brontë’s Villette

Department of English, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 77843, USA
Received: 17 November 2018 / Revised: 18 March 2019 / Accepted: 22 March 2019 / Published: 28 March 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Negotiating Spaces in Women’s Writing)
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Abstract

Various critics have examined Charlotte Brontë’s Villette’s missing ending as a proof of Lucy Snowe’s unreliability in leaving the narrative purposefully ambiguous to escape her possible negative ending. I, however, interpret the ending as one of the ways in which she actively and positively refuses the concept of closure, and rather, creates, what I would call, a nomadic narrative. Nomadic narrative is term I coined based on the idea of Rosi Braidotti’s nomadic theory and Georg Lukács’s The Theory of the Novel to re-imagine Lucy’s narration and narrative, not as a concealment, but as an embracement of her nomadic subjectivity and acknowledgement that she has no true end. I further argue that nomadic narrative is a narrative that fractures and recreates itself through its gaps and rewritten portions, gaining its own sense of agency. Unlike narratives that only fixate on protagonists, nomadic narrative becomes an open and posthuman space that allows the incorporation of nonhuman subjects. View Full-Text
Keywords: nomadic narrative; nomadic subjectivity; sexual differences; spatiality; Villette; posthumanism; women’s writing; Lucy Snowe; Rosi Braidotti; Theory of the Novel nomadic narrative; nomadic subjectivity; sexual differences; spatiality; Villette; posthumanism; women’s writing; Lucy Snowe; Rosi Braidotti; Theory of the Novel
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).
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Kim, J. Nomadic Narrative in Charlotte Brontë’s Villette. Humanities 2019, 8, 65.

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