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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle

The Silk Route from Land to Sea

Professor Emeritus, Macalester College, St. Paul, MN 55105, USA
Humanities 2018, 7(2), 32; https://doi.org/10.3390/h7020032
Received: 11 January 2018 / Revised: 30 March 2018 / Accepted: 30 March 2018 / Published: 2 April 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Further Explorations Along the Silk Road)
The Silk Route reached its historic and economic apogee under the Mongol Empire (1207–1368), as a direct result of the policies of Chinggis Khan (Genghis Khan) and his successors. Because the land network proved inefficient for the amount of goods needing transport from one part of the empire to another, the Mongols expanded the Silk Route to ocean shipping and thus created the first Maritime Silk Route. The sea traffic initially expanded the land routes but soon strangled them. With the expansion of the Maritime Silk Route through the fourteenth century, the land connections reverted to local networks and lost their global importance. View Full-Text
Keywords: Maritime Silk Route; Maritime World Order; Mongol Empire; Chinggis Khan; Khubilai Khan; Marco Polo; gerege; ships; ports; Ming dynasty; Yuan dynasty; Riverine Silk Route; Zhou Daguan; Khmer Empire Maritime Silk Route; Maritime World Order; Mongol Empire; Chinggis Khan; Khubilai Khan; Marco Polo; gerege; ships; ports; Ming dynasty; Yuan dynasty; Riverine Silk Route; Zhou Daguan; Khmer Empire
MDPI and ACS Style

Weatherford, J. The Silk Route from Land to Sea. Humanities 2018, 7, 32.

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