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Article

Investing in College Education: Debtors, Bettors, Lenders, Brokers

Department of English, University of Minnesota, Twin Cities, Minneapolis, 55455 MN, USA
Academic Editor: Ronald Strickland
Humanities 2017, 6(2), 20; https://doi.org/10.3390/h6020020
Received: 18 January 2017 / Revised: 14 March 2017 / Accepted: 31 March 2017 / Published: 10 April 2017
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Saving the Humanities from the Neoliberal University)
Federal and private lenders have issued college student loans, now rising above $1.3 trillion nationwide and, to gain revenues for continued lending, sell them to securitizers who in turn bundle them into asset-backed securities. This paper argues that the magnitude of debt, high rates of default and forgiveness, and uncertain long-term repayment by borrowers facing lackluster job opportunities replicate the techniques of neoliberal financialization (subprime mortgages, securitization, overstocked housing market) that triggered the 2008 economic meltdown. View Full-Text
Keywords: college student debt; Federal Direct Loan Program; loan industry; financialization; loan securitization; profit from debt college student debt; Federal Direct Loan Program; loan industry; financialization; loan securitization; profit from debt
MDPI and ACS Style

Messer-Davidow, E. Investing in College Education: Debtors, Bettors, Lenders, Brokers. Humanities 2017, 6, 20. https://doi.org/10.3390/h6020020

AMA Style

Messer-Davidow E. Investing in College Education: Debtors, Bettors, Lenders, Brokers. Humanities. 2017; 6(2):20. https://doi.org/10.3390/h6020020

Chicago/Turabian Style

Messer-Davidow, Ellen. 2017. "Investing in College Education: Debtors, Bettors, Lenders, Brokers" Humanities 6, no. 2: 20. https://doi.org/10.3390/h6020020

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