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Article

Do We Have a New Song Yet? The New Wave of Women’s Novels and the Homeric Tradition

Department of Classics, University of Reading, Reading RG6 6PU, UK
Humanities 2022, 11(2), 49; https://doi.org/10.3390/h11020049
Received: 27 January 2022 / Revised: 22 March 2022 / Accepted: 23 March 2022 / Published: 5 April 2022
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Greek Mythology & Modern Culture: Reshaping Aesthetic Tastes)
The relationship between women and classical antiquity, its texts, artefacts, and study, has been fraught to say the least; the discipline of Classics has often been defined by the exclusion of women, in terms of their education and their ability to contribute to debates more generally. However, we are currently in the middle of an astonishing period when women are laying more of a claim to the discipline than ever before. This article examines three recent novels by women which take on the cultural weight of the Homeric epics, Iliad and Odyssey, to explore the possibilities of a ‘new song’ that foregrounds female characters. The novels experiment with different narrative voices and are self-conscious about the practices of story-telling and of bardic song. Their awareness of their challenge to and contest with Homeric tradition renders their ‘new songs’ fragile as well as precious. View Full-Text
Keywords: Briseis; Circe; Calliope; Pat Barker; Madeline Miller; Natalie Haynes; Homer; narrator; bard; song Briseis; Circe; Calliope; Pat Barker; Madeline Miller; Natalie Haynes; Homer; narrator; bard; song
MDPI and ACS Style

Goff, B. Do We Have a New Song Yet? The New Wave of Women’s Novels and the Homeric Tradition. Humanities 2022, 11, 49. https://doi.org/10.3390/h11020049

AMA Style

Goff B. Do We Have a New Song Yet? The New Wave of Women’s Novels and the Homeric Tradition. Humanities. 2022; 11(2):49. https://doi.org/10.3390/h11020049

Chicago/Turabian Style

Goff, Barbara. 2022. "Do We Have a New Song Yet? The New Wave of Women’s Novels and the Homeric Tradition" Humanities 11, no. 2: 49. https://doi.org/10.3390/h11020049

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