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Article

Café Culture as Decolonial Feminist Praxis: Scherezade García’s Blame … Coffee

School of Art, Texas Tech University, 3010 18th St., Lubbock, TX 79409, USA
Humanities 2021, 10(1), 35; https://doi.org/10.3390/h10010035
Received: 12 January 2021 / Revised: 18 February 2021 / Accepted: 21 February 2021 / Published: 25 February 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Gender, Race and the Material Culture)
This article provides a decolonial feminist analysis of Latinx artist Scherezade García’s most recent portable mural, Blame it on the bean: the power of Coffee (2019), created for and installed in the café and library of The People’s Forum, a “movement incubator for working class and marginalized communities” and “collective action” in the heart of Manhattan. This artwork depicts three allegorical women convening over cups of coffee, one of which has precariously overflowed onto a miniaturized portrait of Napoleon Bonaparte, whose undoing was said to have been facilitated by his excessive indulgence in coffee and other commodities of empire. Historically, coffee production was bound to imperial plantocracies, enslavement, and patriarchal networks; today, the industry remains a continued site of oppression and erasure for female workers around the globe. By placing this mural in conversation with the portable material economies of the Caribbean, the gendered history of coffee production and consumption, and the history of female representation in art, this article argues that the mural dismantles heteropatriarchal conventions precisely by invoking café culture—the very mode of social performance that García’s work critiques. In so doing, García subverts the problematically gendered and racialized heritage of coffee with a matriarchal Afrolatinidad that, in the artist’s words, “colonizes the colonizer.” View Full-Text
Keywords: contemporary art; Caribbean; feminism; decolonial theory; coffee; colonialism; public art contemporary art; Caribbean; feminism; decolonial theory; coffee; colonialism; public art
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MDPI and ACS Style

Wolff, L.A. Café Culture as Decolonial Feminist Praxis: Scherezade García’s Blame … Coffee. Humanities 2021, 10, 35. https://doi.org/10.3390/h10010035

AMA Style

Wolff LA. Café Culture as Decolonial Feminist Praxis: Scherezade García’s Blame … Coffee. Humanities. 2021; 10(1):35. https://doi.org/10.3390/h10010035

Chicago/Turabian Style

Wolff, Lesley A. 2021. "Café Culture as Decolonial Feminist Praxis: Scherezade García’s Blame … Coffee" Humanities 10, no. 1: 35. https://doi.org/10.3390/h10010035

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