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Article

Covid-19 and Women’s Triple Burden: Vignettes from Sri Lanka, Malaysia, Vietnam and Australia

1
College of Education, Psychology and Social Work, Flinders University, Bedford Park 5042, Australia
2
College of Business, Government and Law, Flinders University, Bedford Park 5042, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Soc. Sci. 2020, 9(5), 87; https://doi.org/10.3390/socsci9050087
Received: 27 April 2020 / Revised: 18 May 2020 / Accepted: 20 May 2020 / Published: 21 May 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Family, Work and Welfare: A Gender Lens on COVID-19)
During disease outbreaks, women endure additional burdens associated with paid and unpaid work, often without consideration or the alleviation of other life responsibilities. This paper draws on the concept of the triple burden in theorizing the gender divisions in productive and reproductive work and community activities in the context of disaster. Events that include famine, war, natural disaster or disease outbreak are all well documented as increasing women’s vulnerability to a worsening of gendered burdens. In the case of the Covid-19 coronavirus pandemic, this is no different. Focussing on Sri Lanka, Malaysia, Vietnam and Australia, the four vignettes in this paper serve to highlight the intersections between Covid-19 and gendered burdens, particularly in frontline work, unpaid care work and community activities. While pre-disaster gender burdens are well established as strong, our analysis during the early months of the pandemic indicates that women’s burdens are escalating. We estimate that women will endure a worsening of their burdens until the pandemic is well under control, and for a long time after. Public policy and health efforts have not sufficiently acknowledged the issues concerned with the associations between gender and disease outbreaks. View Full-Text
Keywords: Covid-19; coronavirus; disease outbreak; women; gender; productive work; reproductive work; triple burden; triple roles; Sri Lanka; Malaysia; Vietnam; Australia Covid-19; coronavirus; disease outbreak; women; gender; productive work; reproductive work; triple burden; triple roles; Sri Lanka; Malaysia; Vietnam; Australia
MDPI and ACS Style

McLaren, H.J.; Wong, K.R.; Nguyen, K.N.; Mahamadachchi, K.N.D. Covid-19 and Women’s Triple Burden: Vignettes from Sri Lanka, Malaysia, Vietnam and Australia. Soc. Sci. 2020, 9, 87. https://doi.org/10.3390/socsci9050087

AMA Style

McLaren HJ, Wong KR, Nguyen KN, Mahamadachchi KND. Covid-19 and Women’s Triple Burden: Vignettes from Sri Lanka, Malaysia, Vietnam and Australia. Social Sciences. 2020; 9(5):87. https://doi.org/10.3390/socsci9050087

Chicago/Turabian Style

McLaren, Helen J.; Wong, Karen R.; Nguyen, Kieu N.; Mahamadachchi, Komalee N.D. 2020. "Covid-19 and Women’s Triple Burden: Vignettes from Sri Lanka, Malaysia, Vietnam and Australia" Soc. Sci. 9, no. 5: 87. https://doi.org/10.3390/socsci9050087

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Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

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