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Stress, Emotion Regulation, and Well-Being among Canadian Faculty Members in Research-Intensive Universities

Department of Educational and Counselling Psychology, McGill University, Montreal, QC H3A 1Y2, Canada
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Soc. Sci. 2020, 9(12), 227; https://doi.org/10.3390/socsci9120227
Received: 22 September 2020 / Revised: 18 November 2020 / Accepted: 25 November 2020 / Published: 10 December 2020
Existing research reveals the academic profession to be stressful and emotion-laden. Recent evidence further shows job-related stress and emotion regulation to impact faculty well-being and productivity. The present study recruited 414 Canadian faculty members from 13 English-speaking research-intensive universities. We examined the associations between perceived stressors, emotion regulation strategies, including reappraisal, suppression, adaptive upregulation of positive emotions, maladaptive downregulation of positive emotions, as well as adaptive and maladaptive downregulation of negative emotions, and well-being outcomes (emotional exhaustion, job satisfaction, quitting intentions, psychological maladjustment, and illness symptoms). Additionally, the study explored the moderating role of stress, gender, and years of experience in the link between emotion regulation and well-being as well as the interactions between adaptive and maladaptive emotion regulation strategies in predicting well-being. The results revealed that cognitive reappraisal was a health-beneficial strategy, whereas suppression and maladaptive strategies for downregulating positive and negative emotions were detrimental. Strategies previously defined as adaptive for downregulating negative emotions and upregulating positive emotions did not significantly predict well-being. In contrast, strategies for downregulating negative emotions previously defined as dysfunctional showed the strongest maladaptive associations with ill health. Practical implications and directions for future research are also discussed. View Full-Text
Keywords: post-secondary faculty; stress; emotion regulation; health; well-being post-secondary faculty; stress; emotion regulation; health; well-being
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MDPI and ACS Style

Salimzadeh, R.; Hall, N.C.; Saroyan, A. Stress, Emotion Regulation, and Well-Being among Canadian Faculty Members in Research-Intensive Universities. Soc. Sci. 2020, 9, 227. https://doi.org/10.3390/socsci9120227

AMA Style

Salimzadeh R, Hall NC, Saroyan A. Stress, Emotion Regulation, and Well-Being among Canadian Faculty Members in Research-Intensive Universities. Social Sciences. 2020; 9(12):227. https://doi.org/10.3390/socsci9120227

Chicago/Turabian Style

Salimzadeh, Raheleh, Nathan C. Hall, and Alenoush Saroyan. 2020. "Stress, Emotion Regulation, and Well-Being among Canadian Faculty Members in Research-Intensive Universities" Social Sciences 9, no. 12: 227. https://doi.org/10.3390/socsci9120227

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