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Review

Understanding Fake News Consumption: A Review

1
Department of Communication, Philosophy and Politics, University of Beira Interior (UBI), 6201-001 Covilhã, Portugal
2
Labcom.IFP—Communication and Arts, University of Beira Interior (UBI), 6201-001 Covilhã, Portugal
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Soc. Sci. 2020, 9(10), 185; https://doi.org/10.3390/socsci9100185
Received: 16 September 2020 / Revised: 4 October 2020 / Accepted: 6 October 2020 / Published: 16 October 2020
Combating the spread of fake news remains a difficult problem. For this reason, it is increasingly urgent to understand the phenomenon of fake news. This review aims to see why fake news is widely shared on social media and why some people believe it. The presentation of its structure (from the images chosen, the format of the titles and the language used in the text) can explain the reasons for going viral and what factors are associated with the belief in fake news. We show that fake news explores all possible aspects to attract the reader’s attention, from the formation of the title to the language used throughout the body of the text. The proliferation and success of fake news are associated with its characteristics (more surreal, exaggerated, impressive, emotional, persuasive, clickbait, shocking images), which seem to be strategically thought out and exploited by the creators of fake news. This review shows that fake news continues to be widely shared and consumed because that is the main objective of its creators. Although some studies do not support these correlations, it appears that conservatives, right-wing people, the elderly and less educated people are more likely to believe and spread fake news. View Full-Text
Keywords: fake news; media consumption; social media; political ideology fake news; media consumption; social media; political ideology
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MDPI and ACS Style

Baptista, J.P.; Gradim, A. Understanding Fake News Consumption: A Review. Soc. Sci. 2020, 9, 185. https://doi.org/10.3390/socsci9100185

AMA Style

Baptista JP, Gradim A. Understanding Fake News Consumption: A Review. Social Sciences. 2020; 9(10):185. https://doi.org/10.3390/socsci9100185

Chicago/Turabian Style

Baptista, João P., and Anabela Gradim. 2020. "Understanding Fake News Consumption: A Review" Social Sciences 9, no. 10: 185. https://doi.org/10.3390/socsci9100185

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