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Article

Relationship between Emotional Intelligence, Victimization, and Academic Achievement in High School Students

1
Department of Education, University of Almería, La Cañada, 04120 Almería, Spain
2
Health Research Centre, Department of Psychology, University of Almería, La Cañada, 04120 Almería, Spain
3
Health Research Centre, Department of Nursing, Physiotherapy and Medicine, University of Almería, La Cañada, 04120 Almería, Spain
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Nigel Parton
Soc. Sci. 2022, 11(6), 247; https://doi.org/10.3390/socsci11060247
Received: 13 April 2022 / Revised: 27 May 2022 / Accepted: 27 May 2022 / Published: 1 June 2022
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Reducing School Violence)
The study of bullying implies analyzing the emotional competences of students, and it has been demonstrated that this phenomenon is due to the poor management of emotions. This study explores whether high scores in Emotional Intelligence (EI) are positively related to academic performance and negatively to bullying. The sample composition focused on students of Compulsory Secondary Education, formed by 3451 subjects aged between 11 and 18 years (50.88% women and 49.12% men). The selection of the high schools was made for non-random convenience, administering Peer Bullying Questionnaire (CAI), TMM-24 and school grades. To analyze the results, a model of structural equations was used by estimating the maximum likelihood together with the bootstrapping procedure. We concluded that EI stands as a protector against bullying and has a positive impact on academic performance. This infers that having greater clarity, repair and emotional attention correlates with a lower possibility of being bullied, at the same time, a school climate without aggressiveness generates positive links towards the school and towards optimal learning environments. View Full-Text
Keywords: academic achievement; bullying; emotional intelligence; high school; structural equations academic achievement; bullying; emotional intelligence; high school; structural equations
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MDPI and ACS Style

Martínez-Martínez, A.M.; Roith, C.; Aguilar-Parra, J.M.; Manzano-León, A.; Rodríguez-Ferrer, J.M.; López-Liria, R. Relationship between Emotional Intelligence, Victimization, and Academic Achievement in High School Students. Soc. Sci. 2022, 11, 247. https://doi.org/10.3390/socsci11060247

AMA Style

Martínez-Martínez AM, Roith C, Aguilar-Parra JM, Manzano-León A, Rodríguez-Ferrer JM, López-Liria R. Relationship between Emotional Intelligence, Victimization, and Academic Achievement in High School Students. Social Sciences. 2022; 11(6):247. https://doi.org/10.3390/socsci11060247

Chicago/Turabian Style

Martínez-Martínez, Ana María, Christian Roith, José M. Aguilar-Parra, Ana Manzano-León, José M. Rodríguez-Ferrer, and Remedios López-Liria. 2022. "Relationship between Emotional Intelligence, Victimization, and Academic Achievement in High School Students" Social Sciences 11, no. 6: 247. https://doi.org/10.3390/socsci11060247

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