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Article

Working for the Welfare: Support and Supervision Needs of Indigenous Australian Child Protection Practitioners

1
College of Arts, Society and Education, James Cook University, Cairns 4870, Australia
2
Private Consultant, Cairns 4870, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Gerald Cradock
Soc. Sci. 2021, 10(8), 277; https://doi.org/10.3390/socsci10080277
Received: 4 July 2021 / Revised: 15 July 2021 / Accepted: 16 July 2021 / Published: 21 July 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Child Abuse and Child Protection)
Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children are disproportionately represented in all parts of the child protection system in Australia. The recruitment of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander practitioners into child protection systems to work with Indigenous families at risk underpins the government strategy to reduce this over-representation. However, little is known about the experiences of Indigenous people who undertake child protection work or what their support and supervision needs may be. This research is centered on Indigenous Australian child protection practitioners as experts in their own experiences and as such includes large excerpts of their own narratives throughout. Practitioner narratives were collected via qualitative semi-structured in-depth interviews. Critical theory and decolonising frameworks underpinned the research design. The study found that Indigenous child protection practitioners have a unique place in the families, communities and profession. Many viewed their work in the child protection field as an extension of their Indigeneity. This coupled with the historical experience of state-sanctioned removal of Indigenous children during colonisation and contemporarily, informs the need for child protection workplaces to re-think the support and supervision afforded to Indigenous practitioners. View Full-Text
Keywords: Indigenous child protection workers; child protection; Indigenous child protection; staff support and supervision Indigenous child protection workers; child protection; Indigenous child protection; staff support and supervision
MDPI and ACS Style

Oates, F.; Malthouse, K. Working for the Welfare: Support and Supervision Needs of Indigenous Australian Child Protection Practitioners. Soc. Sci. 2021, 10, 277. https://doi.org/10.3390/socsci10080277

AMA Style

Oates F, Malthouse K. Working for the Welfare: Support and Supervision Needs of Indigenous Australian Child Protection Practitioners. Social Sciences. 2021; 10(8):277. https://doi.org/10.3390/socsci10080277

Chicago/Turabian Style

Oates, Fiona, and Kaylene Malthouse. 2021. "Working for the Welfare: Support and Supervision Needs of Indigenous Australian Child Protection Practitioners" Social Sciences 10, no. 8: 277. https://doi.org/10.3390/socsci10080277

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