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Self-Centering Seismic Lateral Force Resisting Systems: High Performance Structures for the City of Tomorrow

1
Advanced Technology for Large Structural Systems (ATLSS) Center, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Lehigh University, 117 ATLSS Drive, Bethlehem, PA 18015, USA
2
Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Virginia Tech, 200 Patton Hall, Blacksburg, VA 24061, USA
3
Department of Civil Engineering, The University of Akron, Auburn Science and Engineering Center, 244 Sumner Street, Akron, OH 44325, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Buildings 2014, 4(3), 520-548; https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings4030520
Received: 12 June 2014 / Revised: 3 September 2014 / Accepted: 4 September 2014 / Published: 18 September 2014
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Seismic-Resistant Building Design)
Structures designed in accordance with even the most modern buildings codes are expected to sustain damage during a severe earthquake; however; these structures are expected to protect the lives of the occupants. Damage to the structure can require expensive repairs; significant business downtime; and in some cases building demolition. If damage occurs to many structures within a city or region; the regional and national economy may be severely disrupted. To address these shortcomings with current seismic lateral force resisting systems and to work towards more resilient; sustainable cities; a new class of seismic lateral force resisting systems that sustains little or no damage under severe earthquakes has been developed. These new seismic lateral force resisting systems reduce or prevent structural damage to nonreplaceable structural elements by softening the structural response elastically through gap opening mechanisms. To dissipate seismic energy; friction elements or replaceable yielding energy dissipation elements are also included. Post-tensioning is often used as a part of these systems to return the structure to a plumb; upright position (self-center) after the earthquake has passed. This paper summarizes the state-of-the art for self-centering seismic lateral force resisting systems and outlines current research challenges for these systems. View Full-Text
Keywords: self-centering; high-performance; resilient; seismic; moment frame; braced frame; shear wall self-centering; high-performance; resilient; seismic; moment frame; braced frame; shear wall
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MDPI and ACS Style

Chancellor, N.B.; Eatherton, M.R.; Roke, D.A.; Akbaş, T. Self-Centering Seismic Lateral Force Resisting Systems: High Performance Structures for the City of Tomorrow. Buildings 2014, 4, 520-548. https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings4030520

AMA Style

Chancellor NB, Eatherton MR, Roke DA, Akbaş T. Self-Centering Seismic Lateral Force Resisting Systems: High Performance Structures for the City of Tomorrow. Buildings. 2014; 4(3):520-548. https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings4030520

Chicago/Turabian Style

Chancellor, Nathan B.; Eatherton, Matthew R.; Roke, David A.; Akbaş, Tuğçe. 2014. "Self-Centering Seismic Lateral Force Resisting Systems: High Performance Structures for the City of Tomorrow" Buildings 4, no. 3: 520-548. https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings4030520

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