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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle

FeS Corrosion Products Formation and Hydrogen Uptake in a Sour Environment for Quenched & Tempered Steel

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Department of Materials, Textiles and Chemical Engineering, Ghent University, Technologiepark 903, B-9052 Zwijnaarde, Belgium
2
Department of Chemistry and Materials, Research Group Electrochemical and Surface Engineering, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Pleinlaan 2, 1050 Brussels, Belgium
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Metals 2018, 8(1), 62; https://doi.org/10.3390/met8010062
Received: 1 December 2017 / Revised: 9 January 2018 / Accepted: 13 January 2018 / Published: 17 January 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Environmentally Assisted Cracking in Advanced High Strength Alloys)
Surface corrosion product formation is one of the important factors affecting the corrosion rate and hydrogen uptake in a H2S environment. However, it is still unclear how the base material composition will affect the corrosion products that are generated, and consequently their impact on the corrosion rate. In this paper, corrosion product formation and the impact of the Mo content of the base material on the composition of the corrosion products and hydrogen absorption in a sour environment was investigated. The corrosion layer was composed of a double layered mackinawite (FeS1−x) structure, which was enriched with molybdenum and chromium. The layers were formed via two different mechanisms, i.e., the inner layer was created via a general oxide film formation corrosion mechanism, whereas the upper layer was formed by a precipitation mechanism. The presence of this double corrosion layer had a large influence on the amount of diffusible hydrogen in the materials. This amount decreased as a function of contact time with the H2S saturated solution, while the corrosion rate of the materials shows no significant reduction. Therefore, the corrosion products are assumed to act as a physical barrier against hydrogen uptake. Mo addition caused a decrease in the maximal amount of diffusible hydrogen. View Full-Text
Keywords: Quenched & Tempered (Q&T) steel; H2S; electron probe micro-analyzer (EPMA); X-ray diffraction (XRD); hydrogen absorption Quenched & Tempered (Q&T) steel; H2S; electron probe micro-analyzer (EPMA); X-ray diffraction (XRD); hydrogen absorption
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Wallaert, E.; Depover, T.; De Graeve, I.; Verbeken, K. FeS Corrosion Products Formation and Hydrogen Uptake in a Sour Environment for Quenched & Tempered Steel. Metals 2018, 8, 62.

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