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Article

Design Implications and Opportunities of Considering Fatigue Strength, Manufacturing Variations and Predictive LCC in Welds

1
The Centre for ECO2 Vehicle Design, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Teknikringen 8, 10044 Stockholm, Sweden
2
Cargotec Sweden AB Bromma Conquip, Kronborgsgränd 23, Box 1133, 16422 Kista, Sweden
3
Lightweight Structures, Engineering Mechanics, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Teknikringen 8, 10044 Stockholm, Sweden
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
These authors contributed equally to this work.
Academic Editor: Pierpaolo Carlone
Metals 2021, 11(10), 1527; https://doi.org/10.3390/met11101527
Received: 27 August 2021 / Revised: 18 September 2021 / Accepted: 21 September 2021 / Published: 26 September 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Technological Aspects in Fatigue Design of Metallic Structures)
Fatigue strength dictates life and cost of welded structures and is often a direct result of initial manufacturing variations and defects. This paper addresses this coupling through proposing and applying the methodology of predictive life-cycle costing (PLCC) to evaluate a welded structure exhibiting manufacturing-induced variations in penetration depth. It is found that if a full-width crack is a fact, a 50% thicker design can result in life-cycle cost reductions of 60% due to reduced repair costs. The paper demonstrates the importance of incorporating manufacturing variations in an early design stage to ensure an overall minimized life-cycle cost. View Full-Text
Keywords: manufacturing variations; life-cycle costing; fatigue assessment; welding; welding defects manufacturing variations; life-cycle costing; fatigue assessment; welding; welding defects
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MDPI and ACS Style

Hagnell, M.K.; Khurshid, M.; Åkermo, M.; Barsoum, Z. Design Implications and Opportunities of Considering Fatigue Strength, Manufacturing Variations and Predictive LCC in Welds. Metals 2021, 11, 1527. https://doi.org/10.3390/met11101527

AMA Style

Hagnell MK, Khurshid M, Åkermo M, Barsoum Z. Design Implications and Opportunities of Considering Fatigue Strength, Manufacturing Variations and Predictive LCC in Welds. Metals. 2021; 11(10):1527. https://doi.org/10.3390/met11101527

Chicago/Turabian Style

Hagnell, Mathilda K., Mansoor Khurshid, Malin Åkermo, and Zuheir Barsoum. 2021. "Design Implications and Opportunities of Considering Fatigue Strength, Manufacturing Variations and Predictive LCC in Welds" Metals 11, no. 10: 1527. https://doi.org/10.3390/met11101527

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