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Open AccessArticle

Bullying and Work-Related Stress in the Irish Workplace

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Discipline of Economics, National University of Ireland, Galway H91 CF50, Ireland
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Discipline of Health Promotion, National University of Ireland, Galway H91 CF50, Ireland
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BresMed Health Solutions, Dublin, Ireland and Discipline of Economics, National University of Ireland, Galway H91 CF50, Ireland
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Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Societies 2019, 9(1), 15; https://doi.org/10.3390/soc9010015
Received: 15 January 2019 / Revised: 8 February 2019 / Accepted: 11 February 2019 / Published: 13 February 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Subjective Well-being Under the Scope of Public Policies)
Work-related stress is increasing in prevalence, with important consequences for employees, employers, the economy, and wider society. While previous research has identified a link between work-related stress and bullying, gaps remain in our understanding of the nature of the relationship. This article uses ordered logistic regression and nationally representative data on 5110 employees from Ireland to empirically analyse the distribution of subjective work-related stress and its relationship with bullying (self-reported). We also consider the role and importance of gender and the presence of a formal policy on respect and dignity at work, as well as the degree to which relationships between management and staff and between staff themselves are related to work-related stress. Amongst the main findings are that employees who reported that they were bullied were considerably more likely to report that they were often or always stressed, while bad and very bad relationships between management and staff were also significantly associated with greater stress, particularly for female employees. Overall, our findings have a range of implications for employees, employers, and policymakers. View Full-Text
Keywords: work-related stress; bullying; staff relationships; gender; ordered logit model; policy; Ireland work-related stress; bullying; staff relationships; gender; ordered logit model; policy; Ireland
MDPI and ACS Style

Cullinan, J.; Hodgins, M.; Hogan, V.; McDermott, M.; Walsh, S. Bullying and Work-Related Stress in the Irish Workplace. Societies 2019, 9, 15.

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