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Societies 2018, 8(3), 64; https://doi.org/10.3390/soc8030064

Inequality Is a Problem of Inference: How People Solve the Social Puzzle of Unequal Outcomes

International Inequalities Institute, London School of Economics and Political Science, London WC2A 2AZ, UK
Received: 30 May 2018 / Revised: 31 July 2018 / Accepted: 2 August 2018 / Published: 7 August 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Attitudes about Inequalities)
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Abstract

A new wave of scholarship recognizes the importance of people’s understanding of inequality that underlies their political convictions, civic values, and policy views. Much less is known, however, about the sources of people’s different beliefs. I argue that scholarship is hampered by a lack of consensus regarding the conceptualization and measurement of inequality beliefs, in the absence of an organizing theory. To fill this gap, in this paper, I develop a framework for studying the social basis of people’s explanations for inequality. I propose that people observe unequal outcomes and must infer the invisible forces that brought these about, be they meritocratic or structural in nature. In making inferences about the causes of inequality, people draw on lessons from past experience and information about the world, both of which are biased and limited by their background, social networks, and the environments they have been exposed to. Looking at inequality beliefs through this lens allows for an investigation into the kinds of experiences and environments that are particularly salient in shaping people’s inferential accounts of inequality. Specifically, I make a case for investigating how socializing institutions such as schools and neighborhoods are “inferential spaces” that shape how children and young adults come to learn about their unequal society and their own place in it. I conclude by proposing testable hypotheses and implications for research. View Full-Text
Keywords: inequality; meritocracy; inference; social context; institutions inequality; meritocracy; inference; social context; institutions
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Mijs, J.J.B. Inequality Is a Problem of Inference: How People Solve the Social Puzzle of Unequal Outcomes. Societies 2018, 8, 64.

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