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Erratum published on 20 June 2018, see Societies 2018, 8(2), 44.
Editorial

On Imaginative Criminology and Its Significance

Department of Criminology, University of Ottawa, Social Sciences Building 14th Floor, Ottawa, ON K1N5N6, Canada
Academic Editor: Gregor Wolbring
Societies 2015, 5(3), 618-630; https://doi.org/10.3390/soc5030618
Received: 20 August 2015 / Accepted: 21 August 2015 / Published: 24 August 2015
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Imaginative Criminology)
In growing numbers criminologists are discovering the value of imaginative and creative approaches for enquiry. There is now a critical mass of criminological work that engages substantively and theoretically with cultural artefacts such as film, fiction, music, dance, art, photography and cultural institutions. In doing so these works highlight criminology’s persistent epistemological and methodological weaknesses. The broad and fragmented “imaginative criminology” movement offers a challenge to an orthodox criminology that is guided by the coercive and constraining bureaucratic categories of criminal justice administration and the criminal law. Imaginative criminology displaces these as the governing categories of criminological thought and practice. Drawing on the work of Pierre Bourdieu, Louis Althusser, and C. Wright Mills this paper considers the movement’s epistemological significance and the challenge posed to criminological orthodoxy. View Full-Text
Keywords: criminological imagination; cultural criminology; theory; methodology; creativity; speculation; critical criminology; doxa; idiographic enquiry criminological imagination; cultural criminology; theory; methodology; creativity; speculation; critical criminology; doxa; idiographic enquiry
MDPI and ACS Style

Frauley, J. On Imaginative Criminology and Its Significance. Societies 2015, 5, 618-630. https://doi.org/10.3390/soc5030618

AMA Style

Frauley J. On Imaginative Criminology and Its Significance. Societies. 2015; 5(3):618-630. https://doi.org/10.3390/soc5030618

Chicago/Turabian Style

Frauley, Jon. 2015. "On Imaginative Criminology and Its Significance" Societies 5, no. 3: 618-630. https://doi.org/10.3390/soc5030618

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