Next Article in Journal / Special Issue
Cyberbullying and Primary-School Aged Children: The Psychological Literature and the Challenge for Sociology
Previous Article in Journal
Reimagining the Educational Field: Thoughts on a Critical Criminology of Education
Previous Article in Special Issue
Mobile Technologies and the Incidence of Cyberbullying in Seven European Countries: Findings from Net Children Go Mobile
Article

The Development of a Self-Report Questionnaire on Coping with Cyberbullying: The Cyberbullying Coping Questionnaire

Faculty of Psychology and Educational Sciences, Open University The Netherlands, Valkenburgerweg 177, PO Box 2960, 6419 AT Heerlen, The Netherlands
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Conor Mc Guckin and Lucie Corcoran
Societies 2015, 5(2), 460-491; https://doi.org/10.3390/soc5020460
Received: 19 January 2015 / Accepted: 23 April 2015 / Published: 18 May 2015
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cyberbullying: Where Are We Now? A Cross-National Understanding)
The negative effects and the continuation of cyberbullying seem to depend on the coping strategies the victims use. To assess their coping strategies, self-report questionnaires (SRQs) are used. However, these SRQs are often subject to several shortcomings: the (single and topological) categorizations used in SRQs do not always adequately differentiate among various coping responses, in addition the strategies of general SRQs fail to accurately measure coping with cyberbullying. This study is therefore aimed to develop a SRQ that specifically measures coping with cyberbullying (i.e., Cyberbullying Coping Questionnaire; CCQ) and to discover whether other, not single and topological, categorizations of coping strategies can be found. Based on previous SRQs used in the (cyber)bullying (i.e., traditional and cyberbullying) literature (i.e., 49 studies were found with three different SRQs measuring coping with traditional bullying, cyberbullying or (cyber)bullying) items and categorizations were selected, compared and merged into a new questionnaire. In compliance with recommendations from the classical test-theory, a principal component analysis and a confirmatory factor analysis were done, and a final model was constructed. Seventeen items loaded onto four different coping categorizations: mental-, passive-, social-, and confrontational-coping. The CCQ appeared to have good internal consistency, acceptable test-retest reliability, good discriminant validity and the development of the CCQ fulfilled many of the recommendations from classical test-theory. The CCQ omits working in single and topological categorizations and measures cognitive, behavioral, approach and avoidance strategies. View Full-Text
Keywords: cyberbullying; bullying; traditional bullying; peer victimization; coping; scale; self-report questionnaire; Cyberbullying Coping Questionnaire cyberbullying; bullying; traditional bullying; peer victimization; coping; scale; self-report questionnaire; Cyberbullying Coping Questionnaire
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Jacobs, N.C.L.; Völlink, T.; Dehue, F.; Lechner, L. The Development of a Self-Report Questionnaire on Coping with Cyberbullying: The Cyberbullying Coping Questionnaire. Societies 2015, 5, 460-491. https://doi.org/10.3390/soc5020460

AMA Style

Jacobs NCL, Völlink T, Dehue F, Lechner L. The Development of a Self-Report Questionnaire on Coping with Cyberbullying: The Cyberbullying Coping Questionnaire. Societies. 2015; 5(2):460-491. https://doi.org/10.3390/soc5020460

Chicago/Turabian Style

Jacobs, Niels C.L., Trijntje Völlink, Francine Dehue, and Lilian Lechner. 2015. "The Development of a Self-Report Questionnaire on Coping with Cyberbullying: The Cyberbullying Coping Questionnaire" Societies 5, no. 2: 460-491. https://doi.org/10.3390/soc5020460

Find Other Styles

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Only visits after 24 November 2015 are recorded.
Back to TopTop