Next Article in Journal
What Matters in a Job? A Multi-Level Study of Job Preference Orientations and the Intrinsic Quality of Work in 25 Societies
Next Article in Special Issue
Storytelling and Arts to Facilitate Community Capacity Building for Urban Planning and Social Work
Previous Article in Journal / Special Issue
Preservation without Representation: Making CLG Programs Vehicles for Inclusive Leadership, Historic Preservation, and Engagement
Article

Gown Goes to Town: Negotiating Mutually Beneficial Relationships between College Students, City Planners, and a Historically Marginalized African-American Neighborhood

1
Department of Urban & Regional Planning, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32306, USA
2
Department of Geography, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32306, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Societies 2020, 10(3), 61; https://doi.org/10.3390/soc10030061
Received: 21 July 2020 / Revised: 6 August 2020 / Accepted: 12 August 2020 / Published: 17 August 2020
University–community partnerships have long sought to develop interventions to empower historically marginalized community members. However, there is limited critical attention to tensions faced when community engaged courses support urban planning initiatives in communities of color. This article explores how three Florida State University planning classes sought to engage the predominantly African-American Griffin Heights community in Tallahassee, Florida. Historically, African-American communities have been marginalized from the planning process, undermining community trust and constraining city planning capacity to effectively engage and plan with African-American community members. In this context, there are opportunities for planning departments with relationships in the African-American community to facilitate more extensive community engagement and urban design processes that interface with broader city planning programs. However, mediating relationships between the community and the city within the context of applied planning classes presents unique challenges. Although city planners have increasingly adopted the language of community engagement, many processes remain inflexible, bureaucratic, and under resourced. Reliance on inexperienced students to step in as community bridges may also limit the effectiveness of community engagement. Thus, while community engaged courses create opportunities to facilitate community empowerment, they also at times risk perpetuating the disenfranchisement of African-American community members in city planning processes. View Full-Text
Keywords: university–community partnerships; community engagement; community planning; urban design; planning with African-American communities; applied planning courses university–community partnerships; community engagement; community planning; urban design; planning with African-American communities; applied planning courses
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Jackson, A.; Holmes, T.; McCreary, T. Gown Goes to Town: Negotiating Mutually Beneficial Relationships between College Students, City Planners, and a Historically Marginalized African-American Neighborhood. Societies 2020, 10, 61. https://doi.org/10.3390/soc10030061

AMA Style

Jackson A, Holmes T, McCreary T. Gown Goes to Town: Negotiating Mutually Beneficial Relationships between College Students, City Planners, and a Historically Marginalized African-American Neighborhood. Societies. 2020; 10(3):61. https://doi.org/10.3390/soc10030061

Chicago/Turabian Style

Jackson, April, Tisha Holmes, and Tyler McCreary. 2020. "Gown Goes to Town: Negotiating Mutually Beneficial Relationships between College Students, City Planners, and a Historically Marginalized African-American Neighborhood" Societies 10, no. 3: 61. https://doi.org/10.3390/soc10030061

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop