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Article

Using Velocity to Predict the Maximum Dynamic Strength in the Power Clean

1
School of Medical and Health Sciences, Edith Cowan University, Joondalup, WA 6065, Australia
2
Directorate of Psychology and Sport, University of Salford, Salford, Greater Manchester M5 4WT, UK
3
Department of Physical Education and Sport, Faculty of Sport Sciences, University of Granada, 18701 Granada, Spain
4
Department of Sports Sciences and Physical Conditioning, Faculty of Education, Universidad Católica de la Santísima Concepción, Concepción 4030000, Chile
5
La Trobe Sport and Exercise Medicine Research Centre (LASEM), Department of Rehabilitation, Nutrition and Sport, School of Allied Health, La Trobe University, Melbourne, VIC 3086, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Sports 2020, 8(9), 129; https://doi.org/10.3390/sports8090129
Received: 3 August 2020 / Revised: 11 September 2020 / Accepted: 14 September 2020 / Published: 18 September 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Perspectives in Resistance Training)
The primary aim of the present study was to examine the commonly performed training exercise for athlete preparation. Twenty-two recreationally trained males (age: 26.3 ± 4.1 y, height: 1.80 ± 0.07 m; body mass (BM): 87.01 ± 13.75 kg, 1-repetitoon maximum(1-RM)/BM: 0.90 ± 0.19 kg) participated in the present study. All subjects had their 1-RM power clean tested with standard procedures. On a separate testing day, subjects performed three repetitions at 30% and 45%, and two repetitions at 70% and 80% of their 1-RM power clean. During all trials during both sessions, peak velocity (PV) and mean velocity (MV) were measured with the use of a GymAware device. There were no significant differences between the actual and estimated 1-RM power clean (p = 0.37, ES = −0.11) when the load-PV profile was utilized. There was a large typical error (TE) present for the load-PV- and load-MV-estimated 1-RM values. Additionally, the raw TE exceeded the smallest worthwhile change for both load-PV and load-MV profile results. Based upon the results of this study, the load-velocity profile is not an acceptable tool for monitoring power clean strength. View Full-Text
Keywords: maximum strength; load-velocity; training intensity; performance tests; resistance training maximum strength; load-velocity; training intensity; performance tests; resistance training
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MDPI and ACS Style

Haff, G.G.; Garcia-Ramos, A.; James, L.P. Using Velocity to Predict the Maximum Dynamic Strength in the Power Clean. Sports 2020, 8, 129. https://doi.org/10.3390/sports8090129

AMA Style

Haff GG, Garcia-Ramos A, James LP. Using Velocity to Predict the Maximum Dynamic Strength in the Power Clean. Sports. 2020; 8(9):129. https://doi.org/10.3390/sports8090129

Chicago/Turabian Style

Haff, G. G., Amador Garcia-Ramos, and Lachlan P. James 2020. "Using Velocity to Predict the Maximum Dynamic Strength in the Power Clean" Sports 8, no. 9: 129. https://doi.org/10.3390/sports8090129

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