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Listening to Preferred Music Improved Running Performance without Changing the Pacing Pattern during a 6 Minute Run Test with Young Male Adults

1
Health and Movement (2SHM) Laboratory, Sport Sciences, High Institute of Sport and Physical Education of Kef, University of Jendouba, Le Kef 7001, Tunisia
2
Higher Institute of Sport and Physical Education, Ksar-Said, University of Manouba, Tunis 2010, Tunisia
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Division of Training and Movement Sciences, University of Potsdam, 14469 Potsdam, Germany
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Tunisian Research Laboratory “Sport Performance Optimization”, National Center of Medicine and Science in Sports (CNMSS), Tunis 1003, Tunisia
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Physical Education Department, College of Education, Sultan Qaboos University, Muscat 123, Oman
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School of Human Kinetics and Recreation, Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John’s, NL A1C 5S7, Canada
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Sports Performance Research Institute New Zealand, AUT University, Auckland 0632, New Zealand
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Sports 2020, 8(5), 61; https://doi.org/10.3390/sports8050061
Received: 13 April 2020 / Revised: 6 May 2020 / Accepted: 8 May 2020 / Published: 11 May 2020
Several studies have investigated the effects of music on both submaximal and maximal exercise performance at a constant work-rate. However, there is a lack of research that has examined the effects of music on the pacing strategy during self-paced exercise. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of preferred music on performance and pacing during a 6 min run test (6-MSPRT) in young male adults. Twenty healthy male participants volunteered for this study. They performed two randomly assigned trials (with or without music) of a 6-MSPRT three days apart. Mean running speed, the adopted pacing strategy, total distance covered (TDC), peak and mean heart rate (HRpeak, HRmean), blood lactate (3 min after the test), and rate of perceived exertion (RPE) were measured. Listening to preferred music during the 6-MSPRT resulted in significant TDC improvement (Δ10%; p = 0.016; effect size (ES) = 0.80). A significantly faster mean running speed was observed when listening to music compared with no music. The improvement of TDC in the present study is explained by a significant overall increase in speed (main effect for conditions) during the music trial. Music failed to modify pacing patterns as suggested by the similar reversed “J-shaped” profile during the two conditions. Blood-lactate concentrations were significantly reduced by 9% (p = 0.006, ES = 1.09) after the 6-MSPRT with music compared to those in the control condition. No statistically significant differences were found between the test conditions for HRpeak, HRmean, and RPE. Therefore, listening to preferred music can have positive effects on exercise performance during the 6-MSPRT, such as greater TDC, faster running speeds, and reduced blood lactate levels but has no effect on the pacing strategy. View Full-Text
Keywords: RPE; work-rate distribution; blood lactate; aerobic exercise RPE; work-rate distribution; blood lactate; aerobic exercise
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MDPI and ACS Style

Jebabli, N.; Granacher, U.; Selmi, M.A.; Al-Haddabi, B.; Behm, D.G.; Chaouachi, A.; Haj Sassi, R. Listening to Preferred Music Improved Running Performance without Changing the Pacing Pattern during a 6 Minute Run Test with Young Male Adults. Sports 2020, 8, 61. https://doi.org/10.3390/sports8050061

AMA Style

Jebabli N, Granacher U, Selmi MA, Al-Haddabi B, Behm DG, Chaouachi A, Haj Sassi R. Listening to Preferred Music Improved Running Performance without Changing the Pacing Pattern during a 6 Minute Run Test with Young Male Adults. Sports. 2020; 8(5):61. https://doi.org/10.3390/sports8050061

Chicago/Turabian Style

Jebabli, Nidhal, Urs Granacher, Mohamed A. Selmi, Badriya Al-Haddabi, David G. Behm, Anis Chaouachi, and Radhouane Haj Sassi. 2020. "Listening to Preferred Music Improved Running Performance without Changing the Pacing Pattern during a 6 Minute Run Test with Young Male Adults" Sports 8, no. 5: 61. https://doi.org/10.3390/sports8050061

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