Next Article in Journal
Injuries in Novice Participants during an Eight-Week Start up CrossFit Program—A Prospective Cohort Study
Next Article in Special Issue
Health and Wellbeing in an Outdoor and Adventure Sports Context
Previous Article in Journal
Changes in Duration and Intensity of the World’s Top-Level Badminton Matches: A Consideration of the Increased Acute Injuries among Elite Women’s Singles Players
Previous Article in Special Issue
Exploring Cognitive Dissonance on a Ski Mountaineering Traverse: A Personal Narrative of an Expedition to ISHINCA (5530 m) in PERU
Open AccessConcept Paper

Reconsidering McKenzie’s Six Adventure Education Programming Elements Using an Ecological Dynamics Lens and Its Implications for Health and Wellbeing

1
School of Events, Tourism and Hospitality Management, Leeds Beckett University, Leeds LS6 3QN, UK
2
Carnegie School of Sport, Leeds Beckett University, Leeds LS6 3QQ, UK
3
Discipline of Psychology, Australian College of Applied Psychology, Brisbane, QLD 4000, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Sports 2020, 8(2), 20; https://doi.org/10.3390/sports8020020
Received: 28 March 2019 / Revised: 6 January 2020 / Accepted: 3 February 2020 / Published: 11 February 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Health and Wellbeing in an Outdoor and Adventure Sports Context)
Two decades ago, McKenzie’s meta-analysis of literature provided six fundamental elements of adventure education programme design still used to guide research and practice today. While the value of McKenzie’s early work should not be underestimated, adventure education has undergone considerable changes. Adventurous activities are now available in urban and indoor contexts and used to facilitate a growing health and wellbeing agenda. The use of risk as part of adventure education programming has also been critiqued. This paper reflects on contemporary notions of adventure, risk and the emergent narratives emphasising the associated psychological benefits. The Ecological Dynamics framework, along with representative design delivery, are presented as a viable way of building on McKenzie’s work. Both consider how effective outcomes in adventure education programmes are achieved through designs that focus on the unique relationship between the individual and their environment. While McKenzie’s six elements recognise the importance of human relationships, Ecological Dynamics forefronts relational elements, not just between participants but, importantly, the task and the environment. Individual participant needs in relation to their everyday life therefore become the focus of adventure education expanding beyond the traditional long-standing narratives of risk and danger. Through these two important concepts, this paper advocates an approach to the design of adventure representative of a participant’s everyday environment. In this way, adventure education outcomes translate beyond the adventure-specific context and align more holistically with the needs of individual participants while also assuring emphasis on individual health and wellbeing. View Full-Text
Keywords: adventure education programming; Ecological Dynamics; adventure education; representative design adventure education programming; Ecological Dynamics; adventure education; representative design
MDPI and ACS Style

King, J.; Hardwell, A.; Brymer, E.; Bedford, A. Reconsidering McKenzie’s Six Adventure Education Programming Elements Using an Ecological Dynamics Lens and Its Implications for Health and Wellbeing. Sports 2020, 8, 20. https://doi.org/10.3390/sports8020020

AMA Style

King J, Hardwell A, Brymer E, Bedford A. Reconsidering McKenzie’s Six Adventure Education Programming Elements Using an Ecological Dynamics Lens and Its Implications for Health and Wellbeing. Sports. 2020; 8(2):20. https://doi.org/10.3390/sports8020020

Chicago/Turabian Style

King, Jason; Hardwell, Ashley; Brymer, Eric; Bedford, Andrew. 2020. "Reconsidering McKenzie’s Six Adventure Education Programming Elements Using an Ecological Dynamics Lens and Its Implications for Health and Wellbeing" Sports 8, no. 2: 20. https://doi.org/10.3390/sports8020020

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop