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Open AccessArticle

Self-Selected Versus Standardised Warm-Ups; Physiological Response on 500 m Sprint Kayak Performance

1
Higher Education Sport, Hartpury University, Gloucester GL19 3BE, UK
2
School of Sport and Exercise Science, University of Lincoln, Lincoln LN6 7TS, UK
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Sports 2020, 8(12), 156; https://doi.org/10.3390/sports8120156
Received: 29 October 2020 / Revised: 24 November 2020 / Accepted: 25 November 2020 / Published: 30 November 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Optimization of Human Performance and Health)
This study investigated the effectiveness of a self-selected (SS) warm-up on 500 m sprint kayak performance (K500) compared to continuous (CON) and intermittent high intensity (INT)-type warm-ups. Twelve nationally ranked sprint kayakers (age 17.7 ± 2.3 years, mass 69.2 ± 10.8 kg) performed CON (15 min at the power at 2 m·mol−1), INT (10 min at 2 m·mol−1, followed by 5 × 10 s sprints at 200% power at VO2max with 50 s recovery at 55% power at VO2max), and SS (athlete’s normal competition warm-up) warm-ups in a randomised order. After a five-minute passive recovery, K500 performance was determined on a kayak ergometer. Heart rate and blood lactate (BLa) were recorded before and immediately after each warm-up and K500 performance. Ratings of perceived exertion (RPE) were recorded at the end of the warm-up and K500. BLa, heart rate, and RPE were generally higher after the INT than CON and SS warm-ups (p < 0.05). No differences in these parameters were found between the conditions for the time trial (p > 0.05). RPE and changes in BLa and heart rate after the K500 were comparable. There were no differences in K500 performance after the CON, SS, or INT warm-ups. Applied practitioners can, therefore, attain similar performance independent of warm-up type. View Full-Text
Keywords: intermittent high-intensity; continuous; kayakers; acute performance; water sport; autoregulation intermittent high-intensity; continuous; kayakers; acute performance; water sport; autoregulation
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MDPI and ACS Style

Dingley, A.F.; Willmott, A.P.; Fernandes, J.F.T. Self-Selected Versus Standardised Warm-Ups; Physiological Response on 500 m Sprint Kayak Performance. Sports 2020, 8, 156. https://doi.org/10.3390/sports8120156

AMA Style

Dingley AF, Willmott AP, Fernandes JFT. Self-Selected Versus Standardised Warm-Ups; Physiological Response on 500 m Sprint Kayak Performance. Sports. 2020; 8(12):156. https://doi.org/10.3390/sports8120156

Chicago/Turabian Style

Dingley, Amelia F.; Willmott, Alexander P.; Fernandes, John F.T. 2020. "Self-Selected Versus Standardised Warm-Ups; Physiological Response on 500 m Sprint Kayak Performance" Sports 8, no. 12: 156. https://doi.org/10.3390/sports8120156

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