Next Article in Journal
Motives for Exercising and Associations with Body Composition in Icelandic Adolescents
Previous Article in Journal
Recognition of Foot Strike Pattern in Asian Recreational Runners
Open AccessArticle

Effects of Self-Talk Training on Competitive Anxiety, Self-Efficacy, Volitional Skills, and Performance: An Intervention Study with Junior Sub-Elite Athletes

1
Faculty of Sport Science, Institute of Sport Psychology and Physical Education, Leipzig University, 04109 Leipzig, Germany
2
Faculty of Life Sciences, Institute of Personality Psychology and Psychological Assessment, Leipzig University, 04109 Leipzig, Germany
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Sports 2019, 7(6), 148; https://doi.org/10.3390/sports7060148
Received: 10 May 2019 / Revised: 7 June 2019 / Accepted: 14 June 2019 / Published: 19 June 2019
(1) Background: Self-talk (ST) is used to influence athletes’ thoughts, feelings, and behaviors. Samples of squad and competitive athletes are underrepresented, although research has proven the positive effects of ST in the context of sports. Thus, the present study focused on the impact of ST on psychological and performance outcomes of junior sub-elite athletes. (2) Methods: N = 117 athletes (55 females, 62 males; M = 16.0 years) were randomly assigned to either one of two experimental groups or to a control group (n = 30). The experimental groups received an ST intervention for either one week (n = 36) or eight weeks (n = 38), and the control group received no ST training. The dependent variables (competitive anxiety, volitional skills, self-efficacy, and coaches’ performance ratings) were assessed three times before and after the intervention. It was expected that (a) an ST intervention would reduce the competitive anxiety and increase volitional skills, self-efficacy, and performance; and, (b) long-term training would lead to higher effects than short-term training. (3) Results: As expected, ST training led to (less) somatic state anxiety and (higher) state self-confidence, self-optimization, self-efficacy, and performance. Additionally, long-term training was more effective than short-term training. (4) Conclusions: Targeted ST interventions may help to improve junior athletes’ psychological states and performance. View Full-Text
Keywords: junior elite athletes; competitive anxiety; psychological skills training; self-efficacy; self-talk junior elite athletes; competitive anxiety; psychological skills training; self-efficacy; self-talk
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Walter, N.; Nikoleizig, L.; Alfermann, D. Effects of Self-Talk Training on Competitive Anxiety, Self-Efficacy, Volitional Skills, and Performance: An Intervention Study with Junior Sub-Elite Athletes. Sports 2019, 7, 148.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop